2016-2017 PROGRAM OF STUDIES & REGISTRATION GUIDE

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MISSION

Eldorado High School is dedicated to providing a safe learning environment that promotes academic excellence, character development, and responsible citizens.

BELIEFS

  • We believe that each student is a unique individual who can learn, achieve and succeed.
  • We believe a person should never stop striving for more knowledge.
  • We believe that students are accountable for their decision, actions and educational success.
  • We believe a quality school focuses on academic achievement.
  • We believe that a safe, physically comfortable environment promotes student learning.
  • We believe our institution should promote good citizenship and community involvement.
  • We believe that personal integrity is essential to our community, country and the world.DISCRIMINATION LANGUAGEThe Clark County School District does not knowingly discriminate against any person on the basis of race, color, creed, religion, national or ethnic origin, sex, age, or disability in admission or access to, or treatment or employment in, or participation in its programs and activities and provide equal access to the Boy Scouts of America and other designated youth groups.

    TABLE OF CONTENTS

Code of Honor …………………………………………………….3

Business Department …………………………………………….24

Preregistration Information ………………………………………4

Career and Technical Education Department…………………..25

Course Selection Guidelines …………………………………….4

Animation …………………………………………………………..25

Prerequisites ………………………………………………………4

Automotive …………………………………………………………25

Class Fees …………………………………………………………5

Business and Marketing ………………………………………….26

Schedule Change Policy …………………………………………5

Computer Science ………………………………………………..26

Diploma Options …………………………………………………..6

Diesel ……………………………………………………………….27

Honors & Advanced Placement Programs ……………………10

Graphic Design ……………………………………………………27

Matriculation of Students ………………………………………..11

Information Technology …………………………………………..28

Require H.S. Student Class Load ……………………………..11

Photography ………………………………………………………28

Attendance Requirements ………………………………………11

Robotics ………. …………………………………………………..28

Repeating Courses ………………………………………………11

English Department Core Classes ………………………………30

Physical Education (PE) II Waiver Credit ……………………..11

English Department Elective Classes ………………………….32

Concurrent Credit Options ……………………………………..12

Foreign Languages Department ………………………………..33

External Credit Option …………………………………………..12

Math Department ………………………………………………….36

CCSD Athletic Eligibility …………………………………………14

Military Science Navy Junior ROTC …………………………….40

NCAA Initial Eligibility…………………………………………….14

Performing Arts Department …………………………………….43

Planning for College …………………………………………….16

Dance ………………………………………………………………44

Valedictorian and Salutatorian …………………………………16

Instrumental Music Studies ………………………………………44

Four Year Academic Plan ………………………………………16

Theatrical Studies …………………………………………………45

Testing For College ……………………………………………..16

Physical Education Department …………………………………48

CCSD Guidance and Counseling Website ……………………17

Science Department Core Classes ……………………………..50

Transcripts ……………………………………………………….17

Science Department Elective Classes ………………………….53

Millennium Scholarship ………………………………………….17

Social Studies Department Core Classes ……………………..55

Scholarships & Grants ………………………………………….17

Social Studies Department Elective Classes ………………….56

Tech Prep …………………………………………………………17

Magnet School …………………………………………………….57

Post Graduating Planning ………………………………………19

Magnet Student Sequence of Classes ………………………….58

Foreign Exchange ……………………………………………….19

Digital Game and Web Design Development …………………59

Course Fee Sheet ……………………………………………….21

Student Services Department ……………………………………60

Art Department …………………………………………………..23

Academic Planning ……………………………………………….63

Code of Honor

Nevada Department of Education

There is a clear expectation that all students will perform academic tasks with honor and integrity, with the support of parents, staff, faculty, administration, and the community. The learning process requires students to think, process, organize, and create their own ideas. Throughout this process, students gain knowledge, self-respect, and ownership in the work that they do. These qualities provide a solid foundation for life skills, impacting people positively throughout their lives. Cheating and plagiarism violate the fundamental learning process and compromise personal integrity and one’s honor. Students demonstrate academic honesty and integrity by not cheating, plagiarizing, or using information unethically in any way.

What is cheating?

Cheating or academic dishonesty can take many forms, but always involves the improper taking of information from and/or giving of information to another student, individual, or other source. Examples of cheating can include, but are not limited to:

  • Taking or copying answers on an examination or any other assignment from another student or other source
  • Giving answers on an examination or any other assignment to another student
  • Copying assignments that are turned in as original work
  • Collaborating on exams, assignments, papers, and/or projects without specific teacher permission
  • Allowing others to do the research or writing for an assigned paper
  • Using unauthorized electronic devices
  • Falsifying data or lab results, including changing grades electronicallyWhat is plagiarism?Plagiarism is a common form of cheating or academic dishonesty in the school setting. It is representing another person’s works or ideas as your own without giving credit to the proper source and submitting it for any purpose. Examples of plagiarism can include, but are not limited to:
  • Submitting someone else’s work, such as published sources in part or whole, as your own without giving credit to the source
  • Turning in purchased papers or papers from the Internet written by someone else
  • Representing another person’s artistic or scholarly works such as musical compositions, computer programs,photographs, drawings, or paintings as your own
  • Helping others plagiarize by giving them your workAll stakeholders have a responsibility in maintaining academic honesty. Educators must provide the tools and teach the concepts that afford students the knowledge to understand the characteristics of cheating and plagiarism. Parents must support their students in making good decisions relative to completing coursework assignments and taking exams. Students must produce work that is theirs alone, recognizing the importance of thinking for themselves and learning independently, when that is the nature of the assignment. Adhering to the Code of Honor for the purposes of academic honesty promotes an essential skill that goes beyond the school environment. Honesty and integrity are useful and valuable traits impacting one’s life.Questions or concerns regarding the consequences associated with a violation of the Code of Honor may be directed towards your child’s school administration and/or the school district.

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Pre-Registration Information

INTRODUCTION

The information in this publication has been compiled to assist students in planning their four years of high school course work. The courses that will be offered at Eldorado High School for the upcoming school year are courses selected by the students during spring preregistration. Generally, the courses listed in this registration guide will only be offered in the curriculum for the next school year if twenty-five (25) or more students preregister for a course. If fewer than twenty-five students request the course, the course may be canceled and those students will be rescheduled into their alternate course(s). Choose alternative choices wisely.

COURSE SELECTION GUIDELINES

The following important information should be reviewed by students and parents before selecting classes:
1. Review graduation requirements.
2. Set educational goals to prepare for your post-secondary plans and career interests.
3. Complete the sample four-year high school plan form on page 43 and keep it for reference in selecting your courses in

the following years.
4. Research the requirements for the college, university, or technical school you are considering in order to ensure that

you are selecting your courses appropriately.
5. Prior courses may be repeated for a higher grade with the clearance of your counselor.
6. Any course taken outside of the Eldorado High School campus MUST be approved and signed off by your counselor

first.

7. YOU WILL BE EXPECTED TO REMAIN IN YOUR COURSES THROUGHOUT THE ACADEMIC YEAR UNLESS A CHANGE IS NECESSITATED BECAUSE OF ERRORS IN PLACEMENT OR GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS.

8. Courses dropped after the 15th day of a semester will receive a grade of “F”.

READ the entire Course Catalog and course descriptions carefully before you register. Be certain that prerequisites for selected courses have been met. Complete course descriptions including prerequisites, graduation requirements, and fees can be found in the EHS catalog.

DISCUSS your course selection with your parents, teachers and counselor before registration. Reviewing the requirements for the type of diploma you are seeking. Many courses require teacher approval, and recommendations will be made for math, science, English, and social studies, if applicable.

CHOOSE courses that will challenge you and provide you with the best possible preparation for your future terms of employment and further education.

COMPLETE the registration process. Choose your required classes first; then choose your electives. Choose two alternative courses. In the event some of your electives are filled, you will be assigned your alternate choice(s). Students planning to attend summer school will be preregistered based on the next logical course sequence according to their spring schedule. If a student successfully completes summer school, he/she may change courses upon returning to school in the fall.

UNDERSTAND you will be expected to remain in year-long classes for the entire year. Exceptions (graduation requirements, misplacement) will be handled through the regular schedule change procedure.

PREREQUISITES

Prerequisites are listed in the Course Catalog to help students and parents make the best educational decisions possible. Students must either meet these prerequisites to enroll in a course or request permission to challenge the course. Both semesters of a prerequisite course must be successfully completed.

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CLASS FEES

Elective class fees are charged for select elective classes where students complete special projects to be taken home. These class fees cover the actual cost for the projects. A family’s difficulty purchasing all of the desired/necessary items for the student and/or paying necessary fees will not prevent a student’s enrollment in any class. If alternatives to immediate payment of fees must be considered, the counselor or the respective teacher(s) should be contacted.

SCHEDULE CHANGE POLICY

Since advanced planning and guidance are provided for each student prior to registration, schedule changes will not be made after registration. Class changes will not be granted to accommodate a change in a student’s lunch period or to request a specific instructor. After 15 days into the semester, due to the State of Nevada Department of Education’s requirement for the number of hours needed to earn credit, no student may change or withdraw from a class. Students who drop a class after the first 15 days will receive an “F” on the semester transcript. No student may change a class and receive credit after the 15th day of the semester. Requests for schedule changes are considered only during the first three weeks of the semester and are granted only for the following reasons:

1. Minimum competency preparation for the Nevada High School Proficiency Exam. 2. Graduation requirement fulfillment, if class has not been taken previously.
3. Misplacement in an academic area according to standardized scores and/or ability. 4. Successful completion of summer school course work.

The administration may, due to increased/decreased enrollment and staff changes, balance course selections by transferring students from one class and/or teacher to another section. Every effort will be made to ensure a smooth transition for students.

Students will be expected to remain in year-long courses for the entire school year. Exceptions (graduation requirements, misplacement) will be handled through the regular schedule change procedure.

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Diploma Options

NON-DISCRIMINATION LANGUAGE

The Clark County School District does not knowingly discriminate against any person on the basis of race, color, creed, religion, national or ethnic origin, sex, age, or disability in admission or access to, or treatment or employment in, or participation in its programs and activities and provide equal access to the Boy Scouts of America and other designated youth groups.

21st CENTURY COURSE OF STUDY EXPECTATIONS

The Clark County School District expects all students to meet the requirements of the 21st Century Course of Study Expectations. In addition to the three years of mathematics and two years of science necessary to graduate with a high school standard diploma, students will be scheduled into a fourth year of mathematics, which will include Algebra II, and a third year of science, which will include Biology. The school district expects its students to satisfy the 21st Century Course of Study expectations so that they may competitive in higher education and the workforce and be prepared to take full advantage of what the world has to offer beyond high school.

The Clark County School District believes that all students must be prepared for the following post-secondary opportunities:

  • University/Four-Year College
  • Community/Two-Year College
  • Trade/Technical School
  • Workforce

21ST CENTURY COURSE OF STUDY EXPECTATIONS

AREAS OF STUDY

UNITS

ENGLISH

4

MATHEMATICS (Includes Algebra II)

4

SCIENCE (Includes Biology)

3

WORLD HISTORY or GEOGRAPHY (2011)

1

U.S. HISTORY

1

U.S. GOVERNMENT

1

PHYSICAL EDUCATION

2

HEALTH

1⁄2

USE OF COMPUTERS

1⁄2

ELECTIVES (Includes one Arts/Humanities or Career & Technical Education Course)

51⁄2

TOTAL

221⁄2

The 21st Century Course of Study provides the following for students:

  • Opens Doors to Post-Secondary Education and Workforce Opportunities
  • Meets Nevada System of Higher Education (NSHE) University Admissions

o Grade Point Average (GPA) and Core Curriculum Requirements are: 6

 3.00 GPA (weighted or weighted with Bonus Points) in the core curriculum
 Approved NSHE Core Curriculum (4 English, 3 Math – including Algebra I or higher, 3 Natural

Science, 3 Social Science & History = 13 units) • Prepares Students for the Governor Guinn Millennium Scholarship

o GPA and Core Curriculum Requirements are:

  •   3.25 cumulative GPA (weighted or weighted with bonus points), 21 ACT Composite score, or 990combined( reading and math) SAT score and the core curriculum and the core curriculum
  •   Approved NSHE Core Curriculum (4 English, 4 Math – including Algebra II, 3 Natural Science, 3Social Science & History = 14 units)
  •   Students may not take coursework after graduation to meet Millennium EligibilitySTANDARD DIPLOMAThe following subjects are needed to meet graduation requirements:

STANDARD DIPLOMA

REQUIRED/ELECTIVE AREAS OF STUDY

UNITS

*ENGLISH

4

**MATHEMATICS

3

SCIENCE

2

WORLD HISTORY or GEOGRAPHY (2011)

1

U.S. HISTORY

1

U.S. GOVERNMENT

1

***PHYSICAL EDUCATION

2

HEALTH

1⁄2

****USE OF COMPUTERS

1⁄2

ELECTIVES

71⁄2

TOTAL

221⁄2

*English course units for the Class of 2017 and the Class of 2018 must include English 9 or English 1( 1.0 credit, semester 1 and 2) and English 10 or English 2 ( 1.0 credit, semester 1 and 2).
**Mathematics course units for the following cohort years:
• Class of 2017 and Class of 2018- must include Algebra I or Principles of Algebra (1.0 credit, semester 1 and 2), and Geometry or Principles of Geometry, (1.0 credit, semester 1 and 2).

• Class of 2019 and beyond- must include Algebra I or higher.
*** A maximum of ONE credit may be earned for a P.E. II Waiver by participating in a school approved activity/athletic. ****Satisfactory completion of a semester of a computer literacy course offered in grades 6, 7, or 8 will meet the requirement for the use of computers.

To receive a diploma from a Nevada high school, students in the Classes of 2017 and 2018 must participate in each of the End of Course Exams and pass the aligned courses, take the College and Career Readiness Assessment- ACT with Writing, in addition to meeting course requirements. Students in the Class of 2019 must receive a passing score on each of the End of Course Exams, take the College and Career Readiness Assessment- ACT with Writing and meet course requirements. Passing scores for the End of Course Exams will be determined by the Nevada State Board of Education.

AB288 in the 2013 Legislature eliminated the Certificate of Attendance. Students must meet all of the graduation requirements to receive a diploma and participate in graduation ceremonies. Students receiving an adjusted diploma as prescribed by IEP requirements can also participate in graduation ceremonies.

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ADVANCED DIPLOMA

The following subjects are needed to meet the Advanced Diploma requirements:

ADVANCED DIPLOMA

Required/Elective Areas of Study

Advanced Diploma Units

*ENGLISH

4

**MATHEMATICS

4

SCIENCE

3

WORLD HISTORY OR GEOGRAPHY

1

U.S. HISTORY

1

U.S. GOVERNMENT

1

***PHYSICAL EDUCATION

2

HEALTH

1⁄2

****USE OF COMPUTERS

1⁄2

ARTS/HUMANITIES or CAREER TECH ED ELECTIVE

1

ELECTIVES

6

TOTAL (3.25 GPA without Bonus Points)

24

*English course units for the Class of 2017 and the Class of 2018 must include English 9 or English 1( 1.0 credit, semester 1 and 2) and English 10 or English 2 ( 1.0 credit, semester 1 and 2).
**Mathematics course units for the following cohort years:

  • Class of 2017 and Class of 2018- must include Algebra I or Principles of Algebra (1.0 credit, semester 1 and 2), and Geometry or Principles of Geometry, (1.0 credit, semester 1 and 2).
  • Class of 2019 and beyond- must include Algebra I or higher.
    *** A maximum of ONE credit may be earned for a P.E. II Waiver by participating in a school approved activity/athletic.****Satisfactory completion of a semester of a computer literacy course offered in grades 6, 7, or 8 will meet the requirement for the use of computers.To receive a diploma from a Nevada high school, students in the Classes of 2017 and 2018 must participate in each of the End of Course Exams and pass the aligned courses, take the College and Career Readiness Assessment- ACT with Writing, in addition to meeting course requirements. Students in the Class of 2019 must receive a passing score on each of the End of Course Exams, take the College and Career Readiness Assessment- ACT with Writing and meet course requirements. Passing scores for the End of Course Exams will be determined by the Nevada State Board of Education.

    AB288 in the 2013 Legislature eliminated the Certificate of Attendance. Students must meet all of the graduation requirements to receive a diploma and participate in graduation ceremonies. Students receiving an adjusted diploma as prescribed by IEP requirements can also participate in graduation ceremonies.

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ADVANCED HONORS DIPLOMA

The following subjects are needed to meet the Advanced Honors Diploma requirements:

Students planning to apply to universities with competitive admission requirements may pursue the CCSD Advanced Honors Diploma. The Advanced Honors Diploma requires additional rigorous coursework beyond those required for the Advanced Diploma. Students will be required to fulfill the 24.0 credit Advanced Diploma requirements (including 4-years of mathematics, 3- years of science and an additional Arts/Humanities or Career and Technical Education course) and must complete the Honors, International Baccalaureate (IB), or Advanced Placement (AP) courses required of the Honors Course Program. Students must achieve a minimum of a 3.25 without Bonus Points GPA and 3.85 GPA with Bonus Points. GPA calculations are exact and not rounded to meet diploma requirements.

ADVANCED HONORS DIPLOMA

REQUIRED/ELECTIVE AREAS OF STUDY

Advanced Diploma UNITS

Honors Course Program Units

*ENGLISH

4

3

**MATHEMATICS

4

2

SCIENCE

3

2

SOCIAL STUDIES (must earn all 3 credits) World History or Geography
U.S. History
U.S. Government

3

2

***PHYSICAL EDUCATION

2

HEALTH

1⁄2

****USE OF COMPUTERS

1⁄2

ARTS / HUMANITIES or
CAREER AND TECH ED ELECTIVE

1

ELECTIVES

6

3*

TOTAL (3.25 GPA Without Bonus Points and 3.85 GPA with Bonus points)

24

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+Must include one Honors Foreign Language Course. First year foreign language classes will not receive Honors credit. Student must achieve a minimum 3.25 GPA without Bonus Points and a minimum 3.85 GPA with Bonus Points.

*English course units for the Class of 2017 and the Class of 2018 must include English 9 or English 1( 1.0 credit, semester 1 and 2) and English 10 or English 2 ( 1.0 credit, semester 1 and 2).
**Mathematics course units for the following cohort years:

  • Class of 2017 and Class of 2018- must include Algebra I or Principles of Algebra (1.0 credit, semester 1 and 2), and Geometry or Principles of Geometry, (1.0 credit, semester 1 and 2).
  • Class of 2019 and beyond- must include Algebra I or higher.
    *** A maximum of ONE credit may be earned for a P.E. II Waiver by participating in a school approved activity/athletic.****Satisfactory completion of a semester of a computer literacy course offered in grades 6, 7, or 8 will meet the requirement for the use of computers.

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To receive a diploma from a Nevada high school, students in the Classes of 2017 and 2018 must participate in each of the End of Course Exams and pass the aligned courses, take the College and Career Readiness Assessment- ACT with Writing, in addition to meeting course requirements. Students in the Class of 2019 must receive a passing score on each of the End of Course Exams, take the College and Career Readiness Assessment- ACT with Writing and meet course requirements. Passing scores for the End of Course Exams will be determined by the Nevada State Board of Education.

AB288 in the 2013 Legislature eliminated the Certificate of Attendance. Students must meet all of the graduation requirements to receive a diploma and participate in graduation ceremonies. Students receiving an adjusted diploma as prescribed by IEP requirements can also participate in graduation ceremonies.

HONORS AND ADVANCED PLACEMENT PROGRAMS

The Eldorado High School Honors Program is designed to challenge students to their maximum potential and prepare them to pursue higher education. The program requires a commitment from parents and students recommended to enroll in the Honors Program, which provides an umbrella for the Advanced Placement and Honors courses and may lead to special awards at graduation. Students and parents are advised that a yearlong commitment in each course in required.

Advanced Placement Program

The Advanced Placement (AP) Program is a cooperative educational endeavor with the CollegeBoard in Princeton, New Jersey for academically talented juniors and seniors. Through this program, juniors and seniors in high school take courses that have been developed with college-level material and expectations. Since the curriculum is more in depth than the regular courses, there is a greater opportunity for individual progress and achievement. The Advanced Placement examinations are given each May. All examinations consist of an essay or problem solving section and a series of multiple choice questions. It is expected students will take the AP exam in May. See your school counselor if you have a financial hardship.

Honors Program

Classes designed to be more challenging, requiring higher level thinking skills, and moving at a faster pace are designated Honors classes. Students with 6-9 stanines on a college preparatory track are encouraged to enroll in Honors classes. Honors level classes carry the .025 weighted average. Students may receive a maximum weighted GPA for 14.0 credits as applied to the Advanced Honors Diploma. Students and parents are advised that a yearlong commitment is required.

Students may take Honors courses even if they have not chosen to complete the requirements for the Advanced or Advanced Honors Diploma.

Honors Courses with Bonus Points

Students will earn Bonus Points for successful completion of Honors, Advanced Placement (AP), and International Baccalaureate (IB) courses will be added as follows:

  • Honors .025
  • Advanced Placement (AP) .050
  • International Baccalaureate (IB) .050The GPA Cap with Bonus Points for the Honors Program for students will be added as follows:
  • The GPA with Bonus Points for the Honors Program is no more than twenty-eight semesters (14 classes) of Honors/AP/IB courses. The highest possible GPA under this system is 4.80.
  • Students will receive Bonus Points of .050 for four semesters (2 classes) of AP and/or IB courses and will also receive Bonus Points of .025 for twenty-four semesters (12 classes) of Honors courses.
  • Students who choose to enroll in only Honors level courses will receive Bonus Points of .025 for twenty-eight semesters (14 classes) of Honors courses.Advantages of the Honors Course Offerings

• Most competitive colleges and universities consider not only students’ grades, but also their academic background evidenced by courses listed on the transcript, letters of recommendation from teachers and counselors, and SAT I or ACT scores.

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  • Enrollment in the Honors Program will assist students in their preparation for college entrance exams.
  • The GPA with Bonus Points is used when determining ranking in class.Students may take Honors/Advanced Placement courses even if they have not chosen to complete the requirements for the Advanced Honors Diploma.Matriculation

    Grade classification for high school students is determined by years in school, not on credits earned. Students are classified to the next grade level at the end of each school year.

    CTE College Credit

    CTE College Credit provides an opportunity for secondary students who complete state-approved programs in career and technical education (CTE) to earn postsecondary credit at no cost to the student. CTE College Credit is articulated credit, the high school coursework aligns to postsecondary courses and the teacher of record is a high school CTE teacher.

    To qualify for the CTE College Credit, students must:

    (1) Earn a 3.0 grade point average in their CTE course sequence;
    (2) Pass the state end-of-program technical content assessment;
    (3) Pass the state Workplace Readiness assessment for employability skills.

    Students who complete a CTE program of study according to the criteria are eligible to earn the CTE College Credit within three years of graduating from high school and upon admission to the postsecondary institution. The amount of credit is dependent upon the state standards for each high school CTE program and how the standards align to the college courses for a certificate or degree in a related career pathway.

    Required High School Student Class Load

    The State of Nevada, NAC 387.345, requires all high school students be enrolled as follows:

  • Ninth, tenth, and eleventh grade students must be enrolled in six classes or the equivalent of six periods per day.
  • Twelfth grade students must be enrolled in at least four classes or the equivalent of four periods per day.[Seniors must take at least two classes per day on the block schedule.]Please Note: Although Concurrent Courses, Distance Education, Dual Credit, External Courses, and Work Experience are considered equivalent coursework, students must receive prior approval of the counselor and administration.

    Physical Education II Waiver Credit

    A maximum of ONE credit of Physical Education Waiver credit may be earned toward graduation. Students may earn PE Waiver credit by two methods.
    Students may earn a PE II Waiver if they participate in and complete one of the school-sponsored activities/athletics listed below:

    • Baseball – Varsity, Junior Varsity
    • Basketball – Varsity, Junior Varsity, B-Team
    • Bowling – Varsity, B-Team
    • Cheerleading – Varsity, Junior Varsity, B-Team
    • Cross Country – Varsity
    • Flag Football – Varsity, Junior Varsity, B-Team
    • Football – Varsity, Junior Varsity, B-Team
    • Golf – Varsity
    • Marching Band/Flags/Mascots
    • Soccer – Varsity, Junior Varsity, B-Team

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  • Softball – Varsity, Junior
  • Swimming – Varsity
  • Tennis – Varsity
  • Track – Varsity
  • Volleyball – Varsity, Junior Varsity, B-Team
  • Wrestling – Varsity, Junior VarsityTeam Managers are not eligible for the P.E. Waiver; however, they may be eligible for Community Service credit.
    Students may also earn P.E. Waiver credit by completing 120 hours of external course work under the direct supervision of a qualified instructor or coach who is a credentialed and/or licensed professional outside the school district. Use of external credit for the P.E. Waiver credit requires completion of the CCF-850: External Credit Application. The activity must be geared toward competition or performance-based and it is expected that the student will compete/perform in the activity. Membership in a gym does not meet this criterion.Duplicate Course Work – Repeating Courses

    Students may repeat a failed course one time to improve a grade. Regardless of the number of times a course is repeated, a grade of an “F” will only be removed once. If applicable, all other “F’s” will remain on a transcript.

    CONCURRENT CREDIT OPTIONS

    Students may earn credits beyond the regular school day by enrolling in any of the approved concurrent programs. There is no limit to the number of concurrent credits a student may earn. See your counselor for more information on the following concurrent programs:

    • Nevada Learning Academy – For specific information, including fees, call (702) 855-8435 or visit http://nvlearningacademy.net/.

    •. Adult Education – For specific information on this program, call (702) 799-8650, extension 317 or visit http://schools.ccsd.net/aded/

    • Sunset High Schools/Programs – Call (702) 855-9775 for more information or visit http://ccsd.net/divisions/education- services-division/adult-education-horizon-sunset-high-schools.

    • Summer School – Students may earn credit during the summer. Registration information is available in the counseling office in the spring. Additional information is available at http://ccsd.net/schools/summer-school/.

    EXTERNAL CREDIT OPTIONS

    Students currently enrolled in a Clark County high school may earn a maximum of six external credits toward graduation. External credits are credits earned beyond the regular school day. No external credit will be granted without prior approval and completion of the appropriate application.

    See your counselor for prior approval and applications for the following External Credit options:

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Community Service Credit

A maximum of one credit may be earned for students who complete 120 hours of volunteer service with an approved community agency. One-half credit may be earned for 60 hours of service; court mandated hours do not count for Community Service credit.

Credit By Exam

Students may earn credit by obtaining a score of 70% or better on an examination for a course they have not taken previously or are not enrolled in currently. For a complete list of credit by exam course offerings and fees, see the NVLA website at http://nvlearningacademy.net/. Credit by Exam cannot count toward Honors credit.

Dual Credit

High school credit can be earned for approved college or university courses not offered at the student’s school of enrollment. A three credit college/university course equals one-half unit of high school credit.

Educational Travel Credit

A maximum of one credit may be granted to students who keep a journal while traveling for 42 consecutive days or 1/2 credit for 21 consecutive days. Students must submit their completed journals for evaluation to determine credit.

Enrichment Program Credit

Students may receive credit for academically accelerated courses taken at accredited institutions.

Music Equivalent Credit

A maximum of one credit may be granted to students participating in a music program not offered by the Clark County School District. Credit granting is monitored by the CCSD Department of Fine Arts. Specific application forms must be submitted along with a fee. Call (702)799-8531 for more information.

Online Courses

Credits may be earned for courses completed online from approved institutions. The cost of courses vary. Students must conform to the procedures set by the credit granting institution

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Athletics
Clark County School District Athletic Eligibility:

Initial Eligibility – General Requirements:

  1. Must be enrolled in grades 9-12.
  2. Must reside in the school of enrollment’s attendance zone.
  3. Must be enrolled in a minimum of two units of credit consisting of at least four classes per semester and regularlyattend school.
  4. Must have passed a minimum of two units of credit the immediate preceding semester with a minimum grade pointaverage of 2.0. A student may earn a maximum of one unit of external credit (summer school, correspondence, etc.) toimprove previous semester deficiency.
  5. Transfer students are automatically presumed ineligible. Rebuttal of presumption of ineligibility guidelines arecontained in Nevada Interscholastic Activities Association (NIAA) regulations (NAC 386.785 – 386.799).
  6. Secondary Magnet School students who enroll for less than a three (3) year program or enroll in individual classesare ineligible for athletics at the Magnet School for 180 school days. Students who drop from the Magnet program will become automatically ineligible for athletics at the Magnet School for 180 school days. If a student chooses to return to his/her school of residence, he/she would be ineligible for the remainder of that school year and for 180 school days in any sport in which his/her name appeared on a NIAA roster during his/her attendance at the Magnet School.
  7. Secondary Open Enrollment students who are selected to attend an Open Enrollment school are eligible to participate in athletics. Students who change schools will become automatically ineligible for the remainder of the current school year and for 180 school days in any sport his/her name appeared on an NIAA roster during his/her attendance at the Open Enrollment school.
  8. Career Technical Academy/Charter School/Home-Schooled students are eligible to participate in athletics in the school that is located in the attendance zone of the residence of the parent or legal guardian.

Maintenance of Eligibility:

  1. Must maintain passing grades in all subjects during the current athletic season.
  2. Must regularly attend school. Must be in school in order to participate in practice or games on any given day.
  3. Must maintain positive citizenship. Students on RPC or suspension are not eligible to participate. Serious and/orchronic behavior infractions may result in suspension of athletic participation for up to one year, at the discretion of the principal.
    Additional specific eligibility guidelines are contained in Nevada Interscholastic Activities Association (NIAA) regulations (NAC 386.776 – 386.855) and Clark County School District regulation 5135.NCAA INITIAL ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS

In order to participate in collegiate athletics, students must register with the NCAA at www.eligibilitycenter.org. This should be initiated in the student’s junior year. NCAA Division I and Division II require 16 core courses. See the charts below.

NCAA Division I will require 10 core courses to be completed prior to the seventh semester (seven of the 10 must be a combination of English, math or natural or physical science that meet the distribution requirements below). These 10 courses become “locked in” at the start of the seventh semester and cannot be retaken for grade improvement.

Division I core GPA required to be eligible for competition on or after August 1, 2016, is 2.300. The Division I ACT/SAT minimum score is determined by the core GPA on the Division I sliding scale. Division II requires a minimum SAT score of 820 or ACT sum score of 68 and a core GPA of 2.0. Beginning August 1, 2018, Division II core GPA to be eligible for competition is 2.200. Be sure to look at your high school’s List of NCAA Courses on the NCAA Eligibility Center’s website

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(www.eligibilitycenter.org). Only courses that appear on your school’s List of NCAA Courses will be used in the calculation of the core GPA.

Beginning August 1, 2016, it will be possible for a Division I college-bound student-athlete to still receive athletics aid and the ability to practice with the team if he or she fails to meet the 10 course requirement, but would not be able to compete.

*Remedial, special education, compensatory or related courses do not qualify for initial eligibility **From any core area, foreign language, comparative religion or philosophy.

NCAA ELIGABILITY

REQUIRED COURSES

DIVISION I

DIVISION II

ENGLISH

4

3

MATHEMATICS

4

2

SCIENCE

2

2

ADDITIONAL IN ABOVE

1

3

SOCIAL STUDIES

2

2

ADDITIONAL CORE COURSES **

4

4

*Remedial, special education, compensatory or related courses do not qualify for initial eligibility **From any core area, foreign language, comparative religion or philosophy.

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Planning for College

VALEDICTORIAN AND SALUTATORIAN

Valedictorian status is awarded to the student(s) earning the highest grade point average (with Bonus Points) in the graduating class. Salutatorian status is awarded to the student(s) earning the second highest grade point average (with Bonus Points) in the class. Candidates for the valedictorian/salutatorian designations will be identified at the end of the fall semester of their senior year. The final ranking will be based on any and all completed high school credit granting courses completed by the end of eight semesters, including those courses which receive Bonus Points.

FOUR YEAR COURSE PLAN

A four year Course Plan will be created by all 9th grade students and updated each year thereafter in Infinite Campus. This plan sets forth specific educational goals that students intend to achieve before graduation. The Course Plan, which includes a four year high school Academic Program, will be used as a guide to manage the student’s educational development and course selection in alignment with an identified Academic Program. Revising the Course Plan annually will assist students in preparation for graduation and post-secondary goals.

The plan includes students and parents:

  • Working in consultation with a school counselor to develop the Course Plan
  • Parent review and approval
  • Reviewing the plan yearly and revising as neededTESTING FOR COLLEGECollege Readiness Assessments

    All Clark County School District students will take the PSAT at no cost (pending final budget allocations) during the sophomore year to provide data that will assist in determining the student’s potential success in Advanced Placement (AP) courses. Taking the PSAT in the sophomore year also prepares the student for the SAT. The PSAT taken as a junior (at the cost of the student) is used to identify National Merit Scholarship Semi-finalists.

    All juniors will take the ACT with Writing exam in the Spring. The College and Career Readiness Assessment (ACT) is a requirement for graduation. Juniors will take the ACT in spring of their junior year at no cost. Students planning to attend college may also prepare for the ACT entrance exam by taking the PLAN test during his/her sophomore year. It is recommended that students take ACT and/or SAT in the spring of their junior year, as most four-year colleges/universities require either test for admission. In addition, some colleges/universities require a minimum score on the ACT and/or SAT to determine placement in freshman English and math courses. Finally, some universities determine scholarship eligibility on ACT and/or SAT results.

    Note: It may be necessary to retake the ACT and/or SAT to increase the student’s score. This may enable a student to avoid placement in a remedial math and/or English college course. Remedial courses at Nevada System of Higher Education Institutions provide no college credit and are not paid for by the Millennium Scholarship program.

    PLAN Test

    ACT’s PLAN Test is available to all sophomores. PLAN is the 10th grade test that gives students a forecast of how they might do on the ACT Assessment. The ACT Assessment is taken in the junior and senior year and is used for college admission and placement. In addition to gauging academic achievement, PLAN provides extensive information for education and career planning. It is a helpful experience for all students. Students must sign up for this test and there is a fee.

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CCSD GUIDANCE & COUNSELING WEBSITE

The Guidance and Counseling website which can be found at http://ccsd.net/departments/guidance-counseling is designed to provide students and parents with information on counseling services provided by the school district. It also serves as a support reference for preparing students for their future educational decisions. Information on diploma requirements, scholarship opportunities and post-secondary opportunities are just a few of examples of what is available on the website.

TRANSCRIPTS

Seniors planning to apply to a university or college must send a transcript with their application and a final transcript after graduation. Students may request transcripts from the school registrar before or after school.

GOVERNOR GUINN MILLENNIUM SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM

The State of Nevada’s Governor Guinn Millennium Scholarship Program provides financial support to Nevada’s high school graduates who attend an eligible Nevada community college, state college, or university. You may receive up to a maximum award of $10,000 for undergraduate coursework during the six years following your high school graduation. There is no application form to complete. If you meet all Millennium Scholarship requirements upon high school graduation, the District will submit your name in mid-July to the Office of the State Treasurer. You will receive an award notification early August. A factsheet on policy guidelines and requirements for eligibility can be obtained by calling 1-888-477-2667 or at www.nevadatreasurer.gov. Please note that this information is subject to any changes in state law, policies adopted by the NSHE Board of Regents, availability of funding, and any related matters hereto.

SCHOLARSHIPS & GRANTS

There are four types of financial aide available to help defray the costs of a college education.

  1. Scholarships are monetary awards the student earns and does not have to repay. The student’s high schoolcourse selection (including AP and Honors courses), GPA, financial need, and college entrance examinationscores (ACT, SAT) weigh heavily in determining recipients.
  2. Grants are monetary awards based solely on need. Need is determined from information supplied on a familyfinancial aid form. Grants need not be repaid.
  3. Work-study is employment on or near campus on a part-time basis. Often the university or college makes aneffort to place the student in a job related to his/her major.
  4. Student loans are low-interest monies granted on the basis of need. A loan must be repaid.

A senior should obtain a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) form at www.fafsa.ed.gov or from the student’s counselor. The form should be completed and sent in immediately after January 1 of the student’s senior year. The FAFSA will trigger any federal need-based program for which a student is eligible.

This is a very general outline of financial aide. For information on specific scholarships or programs, the student should contact his/her counselor or visit the College and Career Center in the room on the stage in the cafeteria.

TECH PREP

The Tech Prep Program allows students the opportunity to earn college credit for approved high school courses. These credits are granted to any CCSD student that took a qualifying course in his/her junior or senior year, or who took a course earlier and remained in a qualifying program of study through junior year. Credits earned from the College of Southern Nevada apply to a degree at CSN or may be transferred (for a small fee) to a university or four-year college.

This is a great way to kick start your college education with free credits! To receive your Tech Prep credits, you must:

• Be a high school junior or senior when you apply.
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  • Complete an eligible career and technical course at your high school with a grade A or B and satisfy specific course competencies.
  • Fill out a Tech Prep admissions form from the College of Southern Nevada.

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POST-GRADUATION PLANNING

COMMUNITY COLLEGE SYSTEM INFORMATION

Community colleges, sometimes called junior colleges, offer one and/or two-year programs which lead to an Associate of Arts degree and/or Certificate of Achievement. A high school diploma or its equivalent is recommended for admission.

COLLEGE/UNIVERSITY INFORMATION

Minimum graduation requirements may not necessarily qualify students for admission to the college of their choice. For information concerning specific admission requirements, students may consult their school counselor or Eldorado’s College and Career Center; reference materials in the library; college or university websites; college and university directories; and/or college catalogs located in Eldorado’s College and Career Center.

COLLEGE PREP PROGRAM

The Eldorado High School counseling staff strongly recommends the following minimum college preparatory program: 1. 4 credits in English (Honors/AP if possible)

2. 4 or more credit in math to include Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II, and beyond (Honors/AP if possible) 3. 3 or more credits of lab science to include Biology, Chemistry, an Physics (Honors/AP if possible)
4. 3 credits in social studies to include World History, U.S. History, and U.S. Government (Honors/AP if

possible)
5. 2 to 3 credits in the same foreign language 6. Computer literacy
7. One fine arts/performing arts

ARTS & HUMANITIES

Advanced Band
Advanced Study – Art
Advanced Study – Performing Arts Art I
Chorus
Drawing I
Drawing II
Beginning Band
Intermediate Band
Marching Band
Mariachi

Madrigals
Painting I
Painting II
Theater Technology I Theater Technology II Theater Technology III Theater Technology IV Theater I

Theater II Theater III Theater IV

EARLY GRADUATION

The administration and counseling staff of Eldorado High School strongly discourage students from pursuing early graduation. Four years of high school instruction are very beneficial to academic and social development. However, there are circumstances when students do choose to complete graduation requirements ahead of their class. Students who wish to graduate early must meet the requirements (i.e. proficiency test in science, math, reading, and writing must be passed) and you must have 18 credits at the end of your junior year to be considered for early graduation. All requests must be approved by the principal before the beginning of the last semester in which the student will be in attendance. Students must start the process by meeting with their counselor.

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FOREIGN EXCHANGE

Foreign Exchange students who enroll at Eldorado High School will not receive an Eldorado High School diploma. With the tremendous variety of credits the foreign exchange students have accumulated prior to enrolling at Eldorado and because of the Nevada Proficiency Examinations, it is unrealistic that these students should expect to receive a diploma. Foreign exchange students will be provided with a well-balanced program allowing them to experience the life of an American high school student. Foreign exchange students will be permitted to participate in the commencement ceremony, but will not be part of the graduation processional. The Clark County School District, also, provides a ceremony for foreign exchange students.

http://www.bls.gov/emp/ep_chart_001.htm

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EHS Course Fee Sheet

Course

Fee

Description

Miscellaneous Expenses

Advanced Band

$15

Sheet music and performance materials. Maintenance of instruments.

Art

$15

Fee covers the purchase of consumable art supplies such as sketchbook, rulers, paper, poster board, tape, paint brushes, paint, colored pencils, etc. as well as to replace lost/broken tools.

Auto Technology I

$15

Fee covers consumables that include oils, coolant, fluids and replacing lost/broken tools.

Auto Technology II

$15

Fee covers consumables that include oils, coolant, fluids and replacing lost/broken tools.

Auto Technology III

$15

Fee covers consumables that include oils, coolant, fluids and replacing lost/broken tools.

Auto Technology IV

$15

Fee covers consumables that include oils, coolant, fluids and replacing lost/broken tools.

Chorus (Varsity Choir)

$15

Sheet music and performance materials.

Dance I/II

$20

Students will be responsible for uniform.

Drawing I / II

$15

Fee covers the purchase of consumable art supplies such as sketchbooks, paper, pencils, etc. as well as to replace lost/broken tools.

Glee Club (Women’s Chorale)

$15

Sheet music and performance materials.

Students are required to rent a uniform for $15.00.

Glee Club (Varsity)

$15

Sheet music and performance materials.

Students must purchase their own uniforms.

Glee Club (Men’s Glee)

$15

Sheet music and performance materials.

Intermediate Band

$15

Sheet music and performance materials. Maintenance of instruments.

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Course

Fee

Description

Miscellaneous Expenses

Marching Band

$15

Students are provided with gloves, shoes and a t- shirt.

Students are responsible for additional uniform, travel and incidental expenses.

Madrigals

$15

Sheet music and performance materials.

Students must purchase their own uniforms. Students are also responsible for additional travel and incidental expenses associated with performance and competition.

Mariachi

$15

Sheet music and performance materials. Maintenance of instruments.

Students are also responsible for additional travel and incidental expenses associated with performance and competition.

Painting I / II

$15

This fee will be used to purchase consumable art supplies such as paper, paint, canvas, etc. as well as to replace lost/broken tools.

Photography I

$15

Paper, film, and chemicals required for development. Fee will also be used for camera and computer maintenance for digital media.

Physical Education

$20

Students will be responsible for uniform.

Cost of CPR certification may be charged. Student must buy a combination lock or purchase one from the school.

Robotics

$15

Fee covers consumables

Financial Hardship
A family’s difficulty purchasing all of the desired or necessary items for the student and/or paying necessary fees will not prevent a student’s enrollment in any course. See your counselor if you have a financial hardship.

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Art Department

AP Studio Art: Drawing – 70302 Prerequisite: Teacher approval. Course Scope: Fee: $15 per year plus AP fee

This one-year course facilitates highly motivated students in creating a college level portfolio of artwork demonstrating a mastery of drawing. Students engage a wide range of approaches and media to address various drawing issues through abstract, observational, and/or inventive works. By AP guidelines, digital images of twelve works demonstrating an in-depth exploration are submitted for the Concentration section and twelve works demonstrating a broad understanding of drawing issues are submitted for the Breadth section. Five works of the highest quality are physically mailed for the Quality section of the portfolio. Students should expect to work an additional four to six hours outside of class each week. Exact requirements may change and are specified by the College Board at http://apcentral.collegeboard.com/studiodrawing. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation for all cultures and their important contribution to society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills either one elective credit or one Arts/Humanities credit required for high school graduation and may be repeated. It is expected students will take the AP exam in May. See your counselor if you have a financial hardship.

Art I – 7035
Course Scope: Fee: $15 per year

This one-year foundation course is designed to give entry-level students a solid overview of art production, history, aesthetics and criticism. A strong emphasis is placed on the elements and principles of art and the use of multiple two-dimensional and three-dimensional techniques and media. This broad-based curriculum provides a good general overview or the foundation for advanced art classes. The importance of studio participation as an artist is stressed. This course fulfills one arts/humanities credit required for graduation.

Drawing I – 7085 Prerequisite: Successful completion of Art I with a ‘C’ or better. Course Scope: Fee: $15 per year

This one-year course is designed to give students a strong foundation for drawing through the study of basic drawing techniques and the use of a variety of media and subject matter. Students will participate in exercises in art appreciation and critique to learn to personally consider and judge art. Problem solving, creativity and originality will be cultivated through planning, art making and reflection. The development and influence of drawing for communication and expression will be integrated into learning. Various styles and artists who have used drawing throughout history are introduced. The connection of drawing to other visual arts disciplines and to disciplines outside of the arts will be investigated. Instructional practices will incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation for all cultures and their important contribution to our society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course will fulfill one of the elective credits required for high school graduation.

Drawing II – 7090 Prerequisite: Successful completion of Drawing I with a ‘C’ or better. Course Scope: Fee: $15 per year

This one-year course is designed to expand knowledge and skill through an in-depth study of tools, techniques, media and subject matter, and is a continuation of Drawing I. Students extend the study of art appreciation and participate in self and group critiques while interpreting, defending, and judging art. Problem solving, creativity, and originality are expected in planning, art making, and reflection. Specific drawing styles and significant artists who have used drawing throughout history are emphasized. The connection of drawing to other visual arts disciplines and to disciplines outside of the arts will be expanded. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation for all cultures and their important contribution to our society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills one of the elective credits required for high school graduation.

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Painting I – 7105 Prerequisite: Successful completion of Art I with a ‘C’ or better. Course Scope: Fee: $15 per year

This one-year course is designed to provide students with a strong foundation of painting through the study of basic techniques and the use of a variety of media. Students participate in exercises in art appreciation and critique to learn to personally consider and judge art. Problem solving, creativity, and originality are cultivated through planning, art making, and reflection. The development and influence of painting and painters throughout the ages are integrated into learning. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation for all cultures and their important contribution to our society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills one of the elective credits required for high school graduation.

Painting II – 7110 Prerequisite: Successful completion of Painting I with a ‘C’ or better. Course Scope: Fee: $15 per year

This one-year course is designed to expand knowledge and skill through an in-depth study of tools, techniques, and media associated with painting and is a continuation of Painting I. Students extend the study of art appreciation and participate in self and group critiques while interpreting, defending, and judging art. Problem solving, creativity, and originality are expected in study, planning, art making, and reflection. Specific painting styles and significant painters throughout history are emphasized. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation for all cultures and their important contribution to our society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills one of the elective credits required for high school graduation.

Business Department

Applied Office Practice – 8005 Prerequisites: Administrator/counselor/teacher approval, application required, 2.50 or better GPA, behavior and attendance standard.

Course Scope:
This one-year course is designed to provide the business student with an opportunity to develop clerical skills and personal qualities necessary for success in the business world. The on-the-job training experience will be conducted only in the school office setting. It is desirable to limit enrollment to students who have successfully completed a minimum of one semester in a business education class at the high school level. Student assignment will be made and approved by the Applied Office Practice teacher-coordinator. Telephone switchboard, principal and/or assistant principal offices, registrar’s office, school banker’s office, attendance office, activities and/or athletic director’s office, counseling office, graphic arts, student store, library, audiovisual office, and school nurse are the only areas that qualify for Applied Office Practice student assignments. The student enrolled in the Student Aide Program is excluded from these areas. This course may be repeated, but only two credits may be earned in the Applied Office Practice Program with a maximum of one credit earned in any office area. This course will fulfill one of the elective credits required for graduation.

Student Aide – 8160 Prerequisites: Administrator/counselor /teacher approval, application required, 2.50 or better

GPA, behavior and attendance standard.

Course Scope:
This one-year course is designed to allow students to assist teachers in classroom management. Under the direction of a supervising teacher, students will gain experience in clerical duties, laboratory assistance, working with faculty members, and following directions. Students are assigned to supervising teachers by a formal application process. Students are limited to one credit. This course will fulfill one of the elective credits required for graduation.

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Animation I – 6074

Course Scope:

Career & Technical Education Department Animation

This one-year course provides students with the basic principles of traditional and digital animation. Animation, storyboarding, character creation, and storytelling through animation are the focus of this course. Project-based learning provides students with career-based animation skills. Instructional practice incorporates integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to our society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills one of the elective credits required for high school graduation.

Animation II – 6077 Prerequisite: Successful completion of Animation II with a C or better

Course Scope:

This one-year course provides students with the principles of traditional two-dimensional cel and computer animation, as well as, 3-D animation and graphics. Project-based learning, collaboration, and portfolio development are essential elements of this class. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to our society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills one of the elective credits required for high school graduation.

Automotive Course Scope: Fee: $15 per year

This one-year course introduces students to the operational and scientific nature of automotive component systems. This course focuses on the technological nature of the automobile, including the principles of measurement, atomic structure and properties, chemical reactions, and electronic principles. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills one elective credit required for high school graduation.

Automotive Technology II – 6116 Prerequisite: Successful completion of Automotive Technology I. Course Scope: Fee: $15 per year

This one-year course is designed for students who have successfully completed Automotive Technology I. This course provides students with laboratory activities including tasks with advanced equipment to diagnose and service modern automotive systems. Appropriate scientific, mathematical, and communication concepts are emphasized throughout this course. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills one elective credit required for high school graduation. This course may allow students to earn college credit from CSN.

Automotive Technology III – 6119 Prerequisite: Successful completion of Automotive Technology II. Course Scope: Fee: $15 per year

This one-year course is designed for students who have successfully completed Automotive Technology II. This course provides students with skill development in automotive drive train, heating and air conditioning services, and engine performance. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills one elective credit required for high school graduation.

Automotive Technology I – 6113

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Automotive Technology Advanced Studies – 6110 Prerequisite: Successful completion of Automotive Technology III.
Course Scope: Fee: $15 per year

This one-year course provides students who have achieved all content standards in Automotive Technology an advanced study through investigation and in-depth research. The student collaborates with the supervising teacher to design and implement the topic of study. Coursework may include various work-based learning experiences such as internships and job shadowing, involvement in a school-based enterprise, completion of a capstone project, and/or portfolio development. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills one of the elective credits required for high school graduation and may be repeated.

Business and Marketing

Principles of Business and Marketing – 6762 Course Scope: Fee: $15 per year

This one-year course introduces students to business and marketing concepts in the areas of business management, entrepreneurship, and marketing. Students gain an understanding of principles related to business law, communications, customer relations, economics, information management, and operations. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills one of the elective credits required for high school graduation.

Computer Science Course Scope: Fee: $15 per year

This one-year course is designed to introduce students who have successfully completed Algebra I to the core concepts of computer science. The areas of major emphasis are computer programming, algorithms, and problem-solving. An introductory programming language is used as the vehicle for implementing computer-based solutions. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills either the one half required computer credit and one-half of the elective credit or one elective credit.

Computer Science II Honors – 8410 Prerequisite: Successful completion of Computer Science I with a C or better
Course Scope: Fee: $15 per year

This one-year project-based course emphasizes object-oriented programming, algorithms, and arrays, and builds on the skills acquired in Computer Science I. Topics include program design, program implementation, standard data structures, and standard algorithms. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills either the one-half required computer credit and one-half elective credit or one of the elective credits required for high school graduation.

Computer Science II LAB – 9636 Course Scope: Fee: $15 per year

This one-year course is designed to expand opportunities for applied learning for students who are concurrently enrolled in Computer Science II Honors. This course provides an in-depth lab experience that applies the processes, concepts, and principles as described in the course goals. Project-based learning, collaboration, and portfolio development are essential elements. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to our society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills

Computer Science I – 5340

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one of the elective credits required for high school graduation.

Computer Science III – 5352H Prerequisite: Successful completion of Computer Science II with a C or better
Course Scope: Fee: $15 per year

This one-year course is designed for students who have successfully completed Computer Science II Honors. This course is designated as honors level by the accelerated instructional pacing and depth of content. Students receive practical experience in a second object-oriented programming language. Areas of emphasis include object-oriented programming and algorithms, program design, program implementation, and standard data structures. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills the one-half required computer credit and one-half elective credit or one of the elective credits required for high school graduation.

Diesel

This one-year, three-period course provides students with fundamental diesel engine repair and service skills. It will introduce the operational and scientific nature of diesel component systems. It will provide students with a basic knowledge of diesel engine equipment and operating principles. The diesel repair, maintenance, and diagnostic procedures will enhance students’ awareness of the applications of scientific principles. The students will study the technological nature of diesel-powered equipment, which will include an understanding of the following areas: measurement, atomic structure and properties, chemical reactions, and electronic principles. The proper and safe use of tools and precision test equipment will be emphasized throughout the course. This course will fulfill three of the elective credits required for graduation.

Graphic Design

This one-year course is designed to provide students with the skills and knowledge needed to create a variety of commercial art products. Students gain an understanding of the creative process, with an emphasis on the design principles, layout, and the creation and manipulation of graphics. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills either the one-half required computer credit and one-half elective credit or one of the elective credits required for high school graduation.

Graphic Design II – 6586 Prerequisite: Successful completion of Graphic Design with a C or better Course Scope: Fee: $15 per year

This one-year course builds on the skills and knowledge acquired in Graphics Design I. Students create projects simulating challenges found in the design industry such as corporate identity, publishing, advertising, and package design. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills either the one-half required computer credit and one-half elective credit or one of the elective credits required for high school graduation.

Diesel Technology I – 9670
Course Scope: Fee: $15 per year

Graphic Design I – 6583
Course Scope: Fee: $15 per year

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Information Technology (IT) Service and Support

IT Essentials I – 3620
(Cyber Security)
Course Scope: Fee: $15 per year

This one-year course is designed to provide students with the fundamentals of computer hardware and software. Topics include design, maintenance, repair, and technical support of computer networks. Instructional practices incorporate the integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to our society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. It is recommended that students have successfully completed Algebra I before registering for this course. This course fulfills one elective credit required for high school graduation.

Photography Course Scope: Fee: $15 per year

This one-year course provides students with the fundamentals of commercial photography. Topics include photographic vision, operating cameras, image processing, output, and quality control. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills either one of the elective credits or the Arts/Humanities credit required for high school graduation.

Photography II – 8910 Prerequisite: Successful completion of Photography II with a C or better Course Scope: Fee: $15 per year

This one-year course includes advanced principles of black and white photography as well as digital photography. Digital photography, black and white quality control, perfection of black and white negative processing and printing techniques will be emphasized. Students will be required to exhibit their projects. It is suggested that students successfully complete Photography I before taking this course. This course will fulfill one arts/humanities credit required for high school graduation.

Photography III – 6747 Prerequisite: Successful completion of Photography II with a C or better.

Course Scope: Fee: $15 per year

This one-year, project-based course builds on the skills and knowledge acquired in Photography II. Students gain experience with the advanced principles of commercial photography. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills either one of the elective credits or the Arts/Humanities credit required for high school graduation.

Robotics

This one-year course is designed to provide a hands-on approach to concepts in robotics technologies. This course will be tied directly to laboratory construction of complex robotics systems with emphasis placed on mobile robots and the illustrations of current state of the art research and applications. Additionally, this course will provide the historical development of robotics as a field, effectors and control, integrating sensors, mobile robot controls (reactive, behavior-based, and hybrid), motion planning, robot learning, multi-robot systems, as well as an overview of the field of robotics and their influence on society and the future. In addition to advanced computer science concepts, introductions to the related fields of mechanical and electrical engineering as well as cross-curricular references to the biological, chemical and physical sciences will be provided as appropriate. Instructional practices will incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and

Photography I – 6741

Introduction to Robotics – 6955
Course Scope: Fee: $15 per year

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their important contributions to our society. The use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course will fulfill one of the elective credits required for high school graduation.

Welding

This one-year course introduces students to the concepts and practices of welding. Areas of study include theory and characteristics of metals, welding technologies, welding equipment, tools, safety procedures, machine operation, and industrial applications. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills one of the elective credits required for high school graduation.

Welding Technology I – 9240
Course Scope: Fee: $15 per year

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English 09 – 1010

Course Scope:

English Department Core Classes

This one-year course (Foundations in Composition and the Elements of Text) provides instruction in the English Language Arts strands identified by the Common Core State Standards as reading, writing, speaking and listening, and language. This course is designed to build on knowledge and skills acquired in earlier grades but in more sophisticated ways such as mastering the language, structure, and rhetoric of text; completing more complex writing assignments; reading and analyzing a range of literary and informational discourse, both classic and contemporary; delivering more extensive oral presentations; and participating in a variety of conversations and collaborations with peers. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The appropriate use of technology and digital media are integral parts of this course. This course fulfills one of the English credits required for high school graduation.

English 09 Honors– 10104

Course Scope:

This one-year course (Foundations in Composition, Language, and the Elements of Text) provides instruction in the English Language Arts strands identified by the Common Core State Standards as reading, writing, speaking and listening, and language. This course is designated as honors level by the accelerated instructional pacing and depth of content. This course is designed to build on knowledge and skills acquired in earlier grades but in more sophisticated ways such as mastering the language, grammar, structure, and rhetoric of text; completing more complex writing assignments; reading and analyzing a range of literary and informational discourse, both classic and contemporary; delivering more extensive oral presentations; and participating in a variety of conversations and collaborations with peers. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The appropriate use of technology and digital media are integral parts of this course. This course fulfills one of the English credits required for high school graduation.

English 10 – 1030

Course Scope:

This one-year course (Composition and Themes in Global Text) provides instruction in the English Language Arts strands identified by the Common Core State Standards as reading, writing, speaking and listening, and language. This course focuses on traditional (e.g., argument, persuasion, expository), technical, and creative modes of composition. Through the study of themes found universally in global text, both literary and informational, instruction emphasizes not only critical analysis of text, but also writers’ historical, philosophical, cultural, and ethical perspectives. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The appropriate use of technology and digital media are integral parts of this course. This course fulfills one of the English credits required for high school graduation.

English 10 Honors– 10304

Course Scope:

This one-year course (Composition and Themes in Global Text) provides instruction in the English Language Arts strands identified by the Common Core State Standards as reading, writing, speaking and listening, and language. This course is designated as honors level by the accelerated instructional pacing and depth of content. This course focuses on traditional (e.g., argument, persuasion, expository), technical, and creative modes of composition. Through the study of themes found universally in global text, both literary and informational, instruction emphasizes the critical analysis of text and writers’ historical, philosophical, cultural, and ethical perspectives. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The appropriate use of technology and digital media are integral parts of this course. This course fulfills one of the English credits required for high school graduation.

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English 10 (Pre-AP) Honors– 10504

Course Scope:

This one-year course (Advanced Composition, Language, and Themes in American Text) provides instruction in the English Language Arts strands identified by the Common Core State Standards as reading, writing, speaking and listening, and language. This course is designated as honors by the accelerated instructional pacing and depth of content. This rigorous honors course requires expository, analytical, and argumentative writing assignments that are based on readings representing a wide variety of American prose styles and genres. The course is also structured chronologically based on the genres and movements of American literature. Students are expected to think conceptually about the American past, present, and future as well as about the ethnic and cultural diversity of the American experience. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The appropriate use of technology and digital media are integral parts of this course. This course fulfills one of the English credits required for high school graduation.

English 11 – 1060

Course Scope:

This one-year course (Composition and Themes in American Text) provides instruction in the English Language Arts strands identified by the Common Core State Standards as reading, writing, speaking and listening, and language. This course requires expository, analytical, and argumentative writing assignments that are based on readings representing a wide variety of prose styles and genres. The course is also structured around multicultural themes and perspectives found in literary, non-fiction, and expository texts by American authors to encourage students to think conceptually about the American past, present, and future as well as about the ethnic and cultural diversity of the American experience. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The appropriate use of technology and digital media are integral parts of this course. This course fulfills one of the English credits required for high school graduation.

English 11 Honors – 10604

Course Scope:

This one-year course (Composition and Themes in American Text) provides instruction in the English Language Arts strands identified by the Common Core State Standards as reading, writing, speaking and listening, and language. This course is designated as honors level by the accelerated pacing and depth of content. This course requires expository, analytical, and argumentative writing assignments that are based on readings representing a wide variety of prose styles and genres. The course is structured around multicultural themes and perspectives found in literary, non-fiction, and expository texts by American authors to encourage students to think conceptually about the American past, present, and future as well as about the ethnic and cultural diversity of the American experience. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The appropriate use of technology and digital media are integral parts of this course. This course fulfills one of the English credits required for high school graduation.

English 12 – 1080

Course Scope:

This one-year course (Post-Secondary Composition and Universal Themes in Text) provides instruction in the English Language Arts strands identified by the Common Core State Standards as reading, writing, speaking and listening, and language. Instruction focuses on refining the skills required for post-secondary success. The writing focus in this course includes analysis, synthesis, and argumentation as they relate to workplace and real-world situations. A framework structured around universal themes that connect people across cultures and time anchors texts to real-life reading, writing, and speaking and listening opportunities likely to be experienced beyond high school. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The appropriate use of technology and digital media are integral parts of this course. This course fulfills one of the English credits required for high school graduation.

English 12 Honors– 10804

Course Scope:
This one-year course (Post-Secondary Composition and Universal Themes in Text) provides instruction in the English Language

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Arts strands identified by the Common Core State Standards as reading, writing, speaking and listening, and language. This course is designated as honors level by the accelerated instructional pacing and depth of content. The writing focus in this course includes analysis, synthesis, and argumentation as they relate to post-secondary education and/or careers. Instruction focuses on refining the skills required for post-secondary success. A framework structured around universal themes that connect people across cultures and time anchors texts to real-life reading, writing, and speaking and listening opportunities likely to be experienced beyond high school. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The appropriate use of technology and digital media are integral parts of this course. This course fulfills one of the English credits required for high school graduation.

Journalism Foundations – 1430

Course Scope:

English Department Elective Classes

This one-year course is designed for the study and practice of the basic elements of journalism with major emphasis in the gathering, writing, layout, and dissemination of news through mass media. Students may be required to participate in the production of a newspaper. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The appropriate use of technology and digital media are integral parts of this course. This course fulfills one of the elective credits required for high school graduation.

Journalism II – 1435 Prerequisite – Successful completion of Journalism I.

Course Scope:

This one-year course is a continuation of the study and practice of advanced journalistic skills with major emphasis in the gathering, writing, layout, and dissemination of news through mass media. Students produce the school newspaper. Students apply press law and ethics, student privacy, and intellectual property rights during the production of the newspaper. Students explore different technologies used to publish a newspaper, including online publications of the newspaper. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills one of the elective credits required for high school graduation.

Publications I – 1455

Course Scope:

This one-year course is designed for the study and practice of the foundational elements of publications with major emphasis in information gathering, writing, layout design, and photography. Students participate in the production of the yearbook. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills one of the elective credits required for high school graduation.

Publications II – 1460 Prerequisite – Successful completion of Publications I.

Course Scope:

This one-year course is a continuation of Publications I and is designed for the study and application of the elements of publications with major emphasis in information gathering, writing, layout design, and photography. Students produce a school yearbook demonstrating critical thinking, writing, photography, and technology skills. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills one of the elective credits required for high school graduation.

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German I – 7777

Course Scope:

Foreign Languages Department

This one-year course is designed to facilitate a student’s acquisition of the target language at the novice-high level as identified in the foreign language proficiency guidelines established by the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL). The focus is communication in the target language incorporating an understanding of the target cultures, connecting with other disciplines, comparing native language to the target language, and participating in multicultural communities. The course provides practice in correct use of basic vocabulary and language structures to enable students to function effectively within realistic settings. ACTFL recommends that at least 90% of the instructional time in class be conducted in the target language. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to our society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills one of the elective credits required for high school graduation.

German II H – 77794 Prerequisite – Successful completion of German with a ‘C’ or better.

Course Scope:

This one-year course is designed for students who have successfully completed German I or who demonstrate a proficiency level of novice-high as identified in the foreign language proficiency guidelines established by the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL). Students continue to refine proficiency in the target language with the end-of-course goal of demonstrating proficiency at the intermediate-low level. This course is designated as honors level by the accelerated instructional pacing and depth of content. The focus is communication in the target language incorporating understanding of the target cultures, connecting with other disciplines, comparing native language to the target language, and participating in multicultural communities. The course provides practice in correct use of basic vocabulary and language structures to enable students to function effectively within realistic settings. ACTFL recommends that at least 90% of the instructional time in class be conducted in the target language. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to our society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills one of the elective credits required for high school graduation.

German III H – 77814 Prerequisite – Successful completion of German II with a ‘C’ or better.

Course Scope:

This one-year course is designed for students who have successfully completed German II Honors or who demonstrate a proficiency level of intermediate-low as identified in the foreign language proficiency guidelines established by the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL). Students continue to refine proficiency in the target language with the end-of-course goal of demonstrating proficiency at the intermediate-mid level. This course is designated as honors level by the accelerated instructional pacing and depth of content. The focus is communication in the target language incorporating understanding of the target cultures, connecting with other disciplines, comparing native language to the target language, and participating in multicultural communities. The course provides practice in correct use of basic vocabulary and language structures to enable students to function effectively within realistic settings. ACTFL recommends that at least 90% of the instructional time in class be conducted in the target language. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to our society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills either one of the elective credits or one Arts/Humanities credit required for high school graduation.

AP Spanish Literature and Culture – 78512 Prerequisite: “C” or better in Spanish II Honors.

Course Scope:

This one-year course is designed with an emphasis on meeting the requirements of the College Board Advanced Placement AP Spanish Literature and Culture examination. This college-level curriculum prepares students to use the three modes of communication (interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational) in the intermediate to pre-advanced range as described in the

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American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) Performance Guidelines for K-12 Learners. This course engages students in the study of literature through global, historical, and contemporary cultural contexts while making interdisciplinary connections and exploring linguistic and cultural connections. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills either one of the elective credits or one Arts/Humanities credit required for high school graduation.

AP Spanish Language and Culture – 78502 Prerequisite: “C” or better in Intermediate Spanish Literacy.
Course Scope:

This one-year course is designed with an emphasis on meeting the requirements of the College Board Advanced Placement AP Spanish Language and Culture examination. This college-level curriculum prepares students to use the three modes of communication (interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational) in the Intermediate to Pre-Advanced range as described in the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) Performance Guidelines for K–12 Learners. This course engages students in an exploration of culture in both contemporary and historical contexts. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills either one of the elective credits or the Arts/Humanities credit required for high school graduation.

Spanish I – 7852

Course Scope:

This one-year course is designed to facilitate a student’s acquisition of the target language at the novice-high level as identified in the foreign language proficiency guidelines established by the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL). The focus is communication in the target language incorporating an understanding of the target cultures, connecting with other disciplines, comparing native language to the target language, and participating in multicultural communities. The course provides practice in correct use of basic vocabulary and language structures to enable students to function effectively within realistic settings. ACTFL recommends that at least 90% of the instructional time in class be conducted in the target language. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to our society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills one of the elective credits required for high school graduation.

Spanish II Honors – 78534 Prerequisite: “C” or better in Spanish I.

Course Scope:

This one-year course is designed for students who have successfully completed Spanish I or who demonstrate a proficiency level of novice-high as identified in the foreign language proficiency guidelines established by the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL). Students continue to refine proficiency in the target language with the end-of-course goal of demonstrating proficiency at the intermediate-low level. This course is designated as honors level by the accelerated instructional pacing and depth of content. The focus is communication in the target language incorporating understanding of the target cultures, connecting with other disciplines, comparing native language to the target language, and participating in multicultural communities. The course provides practice in correct use of basic vocabulary and language structures to enable students to function effectively within realistic settings. ACTFL recommends that at least 90% of the instructional time in class be conducted in the target language. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to our society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills one of the elective credits required for high school graduation.

Spanish III Honors – 78544 Prerequisite: “C” or better in Spanish II Honors.

Course Scope:

This one-year course is designed for students who have successfully completed Spanish II Honors or who demonstrate a proficiency level of intermediate-low as identified in the foreign language proficiency guidelines established by the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL). Students continue to refine proficiency in the target language with the end-of-course goal of demonstrating proficiency at the intermediate-mid level. This course is designated as honors level by the

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accelerated instructional pacing and depth of content. The focus is communication in the target language incorporating understanding of the target cultures, connecting with other disciplines, comparing native language to the target language, and participating in multicultural communities. The course provides practice in correct use of basic vocabulary and language structures to enable students to function effectively within realistic settings. ACTFL recommends that at least 90% of the instructional time in class be conducted in the target language. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to our society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills either one of the elective credits or one Arts/Humanities credit required for high school graduation.

Beginning Spanish Literacy – 7860 Prerequisite: Native speaker, teacher recommendation, and

Course Scope:

entrance examination.

This one-year course is designed for students from a Spanish-speaking background to facilitate a their acquisition of the target language at the intermediate-low level as identified in the foreign language proficiency guidelines established by the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL). The focus is communication in the target language incorporating an understanding of the target cultures, connecting with other disciplines, comparing native language to the target language, and participating in multicultural communities. The course provides practice in correct use of basic vocabulary and language structures to enable students to function effectively within realistic settings. ACTFL recommends that at least 90% of the instructional time in class be conducted in the target language. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills one of the elective credits required for high school graduation.

Intermediate Spanish Literacy Honors – 78614 Prerequisite: Native speaker, teacher recommendation, and

Course Scope:

entrance examination.

This one-year course is designed for students from a Spanish-speaking background who have successfully complete Spanish for Spanish Speakers I or who demonstrate a proficiency level of intermediate-low as identified in the foreign language proficiency guidelines established by the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL). Students continue to refine proficiency in the target language with the end-of-course goal of demonstrating proficiency at the intermediate-mid level. The focus is communication in the target language incorporating an understanding of the target cultures, connecting with other disciplines, comparing native language to the target language, and participating in multicultural communities. The course provides practice in correct use of vocabulary and language structures to enable students to function effectively within realistic settings. ACTFL recommends that at least 90% of the instructional time in class be conducted in the target language. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills one of the elective credits required for high school graduation.

Advanced Spanish Literacy III Honors – 78624 Prerequisite: Native speaker, teacher recommendation, and entrance examination, or “C” or better in Spanish for

Course Scope:

Spanish Speakers II Honors.

This one-year course is designed for students from a Spanish-speaking background who have successfully complete Spanish for Spanish Speakers II Honors or who demonstrate a proficiency level of intermediate-mid as identified in the foreign language proficiency guidelines established by the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL). Students continue to refine proficiency in the target language with the end-of-course goal of demonstrating proficiency at the intermediate-high level. The focus is communication in the target language incorporating an understanding of the target cultures, connecting with other disciplines, comparing native language to the target language, and participating in multicultural communities. The course provides practice in correct use of vocabulary and language structures to enable students to function effectively within realistic settings. ACTFL recommends that at least 90% of the instructional time in class be conducted in the target language. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills either one of the elective credits or the Arts/Humanities credit required for high school graduation.

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Secondary Mathematics Course Sequence

Grade 8

Pre-Algebra 8 (CCSS)

Grade 12

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Algebra I (CCSS)

Pre-Algebra HS (CCSS)

Algebra I (CCSS)

Geometry H (CCSS)

Geometry (CCSS)

Advanced Study Math

Algebra II H (CCSS)

Algebra II (CCSS)

Topic of Modern Math

Precalculus AB Honors

College Preparatory Mathematics

AP Calculus AB

AP Statistics

Math Applications (non-proficient seniors)

Math of Personal Finance (Seniors only)

Pre-Algebra I (CCSS) – 2010

Course Scope:

Math Department

This one-year course designed for freshman-level students provides the necessary knowledge and skills to successfully complete algebra and geometry coursework. It is intended to increase mathematical fluency in problem solving, reasoning, modeling, and effective communication in the study of number, algebra, functions, geometry, and statistics. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The use of technology, including calculators and computer software, is an integral part of this course. While this course fulfills one of the mathematics credits required for high school graduation, it does not meet the core requirements for the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) or the Nevada System of Higher Education (NSHE) core requirements for university admission.

Algebra I (CCSS) – 2020

Course Scope:

This one-year course provides students with the necessary knowledge and skills for further studies in mathematics. It is intended to increase mathematical fluency in problem solving, reasoning, modeling, and effective communication in the study of number, algebra, functions, and statistics. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The use of technology, including calculators and computer software, is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills the Algebra I requirement and one of the mathematics credits required for high school graduation.

Geometry (CCSS) – 2060 Grades 10 – 12
Course Scope:

This one-year course provides students with a rigorous study of Euclidean geometry including. It incorporates problem solving, reasoning, modeling, and effective communication in the study of transformational geometry, trigonometry, measurement, and probability. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The use of mathematical tools and technology, including calculators and computer software, is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills one of the mathematics credits required for high school graduation.

Geometry Honors (CCSS) – 20604 Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation, B or higher in Algebra I Grades 9 – 12
Course Scope:

This one-year course provides a rigorous study of Euclidean Geometry for the more advanced mathematics student. Emphasis is on the development of logical reasoning, through techniques of proofs and constructions, geometric concepts, and algebraic applications. Students will extend their ability to make mathematical connections through problem solving. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The use of mathematical tools and technology, including calculators and computer software, is an integral part of this course. This course will fulfill one of the mathematics credits required for high school graduation.

Algebra II (CCSS) – 2090 Prerequisite: Student has to have passed the math portion of the NHSPE

Course Scope:

This one-year course provides students with a study of functions and statistics, including advanced topics. It incorporates problem solving, reasoning, modeling, and effective communication skills through the study of polynomial, rational, radical, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions; the design of statistical studies; and statistical inference. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The use of mathematical tools and technology, including calculators and computer software, is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills one of the mathematics credits required for high school graduation.

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Algebra II Honors (CCSS) – 4800H Prerequisite: Passed Geometry H with a C or higher, teacher recommendation, student has to have passed the math portion of the NHSPE
Course Scope:

This one-year course provides students with a rigorous study of functions and statistics, including advanced topics. This course is designated as honors level by the accelerated instructional pacing and depth of content. It incorporates problem solving, reasoning, modeling, and effective communication skills through the study of polynomial, rational, radical, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions; the design of statistical studies; and statistical inference. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The use of mathematical tools and technology, including calculators and computer software, is an integral part of this course. This course will fulfill one of the mathematics credits required for high school graduation.

College Preparatory Mathematics – 2287

Course Scope:

This rigorous one-year course is designed for students who have successfully completed Algebra II. In preparation for college- level mathematics, the focus of this course is the study of advanced mathematical topics and their applications. Emphasis is on refining problem solving skills through modeling and project-based learning. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The use of technology, including calculators or computer software, is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills one of the mathematics credits required for high school graduation.

Math of Personal Finance – 2330 Grade 12
Course Scope:

This one-year course is the study of personal finance for senior-level students. Students will develop a deeper understanding of the mathematics of finance to include: money management, risk management, and financial planning related to consumer and family studies, career and technical education, and personal finance. The emphasis will be on refining problem-solving skills using project-based learning activities and academic integration within the context of financial applications. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The use of technology, including calculators and computers, is an integral part of this course. This course will fulfill one of the mathematics credits required for high school graduation.

Pre-calculus AB Honors – 21454 Prerequisite: Passed Algebra II H with a C or higher, teacher recommendation, student has to have passed the math portion of the NHSPE
Course Scope:

This rigorous one-year course is designed for the motivated student with a strong background in advanced algebra and will prepare the student for AP Calculus AB. In addition to reviewing topics from trigonometry, this course includes problem-solving techniques using analytic geometry, vectors, matrices, relations and functions and their graphs, probability and statistics, and the introductory concepts of calculus. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to our society. The use of technology, including calculators and computer software, is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills one of the mathematics credits required for high school graduation.

AP Calculus AB – 21802 Prerequisite: Passed Pre-Calculus H with a C or higher, teacher recommendation, student has to have passed the math portion of the NHSPE
Course Scope:

This one-year course is designed with an emphasis on meeting the requirements of the College Board Advanced Placement AP Calculus AB examination. This college-level curriculum is primarily concerned with developing the students’ understanding

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of the concepts of calculus and providing experience with its methods and applications. Before studying calculus, all students should complete four years of secondary mathematics designed for college-bound students: courses in which they study algebra, geometry, trigonometry, analytic geometry and elementary functions. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The use of technology, including graphing calculators and computer software, is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills one of the mathematics credits required for high school graduation. It is expected students will take the AP exam in May. See your counselor if you have a financial hardship.

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Military Science Navy Junior ROTC

The NJROTC program provides an opportunity for high school students to learn about the basic elements and requirements for national security and the personal obligation we have as American citizens. The program promotes patriotism, develops responsible citizens, promotes habits of orderliness and precision and develops a high degree of personal honor, discipline, and leadership. All NJROTC students are required to meet specific grooming standards and wear a military uniform while at school at least one day per week. Field trips are taken to military commands and ships throughout the year. While students are under no obligation to join the military, specific advantages are available to those who choose to do so. Depending on grade point average, class standing, and college entrance examinations scores, NJROTC students may qualify for specific service academy appointments and university ROTC scholarships.

Navy Junior ROTC I – 5275

Course Scope:

This one-year course is designed for second-year students in the Navy Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps (JROTC). The JROTC curriculum emphasizes citizenship, character development, leadership development, and community service. This program is conducted at accredited secondary schools throughout the nation, by instructors who are retired United States Navy (USN) officers and enlisted personnel utilizing curriculum provided by the USN. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills either one of the two physical education credits or one of the elective credits required for high school graduation. Fee: NONE Prerequisites: Must agree to abide by U.S. Navy Standards, rules and regulations. Must be physically capable of performing drill and physical fitness training.

Navy Junior ROTC II – 5280

Course Scope:

This one-year course is designed for second-year students in the Navy Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps (JROTC). The JROTC curriculum emphasizes citizenship, character development, leadership development, and community service. This program is conducted at accredited secondary schools throughout the nation, by instructors who are retired United States Navy (USN) officers and enlisted personnel utilizing curriculum provided by the USN. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills either one of the two physical education credits or one of the elective credits required for high school graduation. Fee: NONE Prerequisites: Must have successfully completed NJROTC I with a “C” or better and have instructor approval. Must agree to abide by U.S. Navy Standards, rules and regulations. Must be physically capable of performing drill and physical fitness training.

Navy Junior ROTC III – 5285

Course Scope:

This one-year course is designed for third-year students in the Navy Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps (JROTC). The JROTC curriculum emphasizes citizenship, character development, leadership development, and community service. This program is conducted at accredited secondary schools throughout the nation, by instructors who are retired United States Navy (USN) officers and enlisted personnel utilizing curriculum provided by the USN. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills either one of the two physical education credits or one of the elective credits required for high school graduation. Fee: NONE Prerequisites: Must have successfully completed NJROTC II with a “C” or better and have instructor approval. Must agree to abide by U.S. Navy Standards, rules and regulations. Must be physically capable of performing drill and physical fitness training.

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Navy Junior ROTC III Honors – 52854

Course Scope:

This one-year course is designed for third-year students in the Navy Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps (JROTC) who serve as members of the JROTC cadet senior staff. Students are assigned specific functional areas of responsibility and are expected to perform their duties/responsibilities in addition to mentoring and leading other members of the organization. The JROTC curriculum emphasizes citizenship, character development, leadership development, and community service. This program is conducted at accredited secondary schools throughout the nation, by instructors who are retired United States Navy (USN) officers and enlisted personnel utilizing curriculum provided by the USN. This course is designated as honors level in that students are expected to apply higher-level leadership, organizational, communication, and interpersonal skills in the performance of their duties. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills either one of the two physical education credits or one of the elective credits required for high school graduation. Fee: NONE Prerequisites: Must have successfully completed NJROTC III with a “C” or better and have instructor approval. Must agree to abide by U.S. Navy Standards, rules and regulations. Must be physically capable of performing drill and physical fitness training.

Navy Junior ROTC IV – 5290

Course Scope:

This one-year course is designed for fourth-year students in the Navy Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps (JROTC). The JROTC curriculum emphasizes citizenship, character development, leadership development, and community service. This program is conducted at accredited secondary schools throughout the nation, by instructors who are retired United States Navy (USN) officers and enlisted personnel utilizing curriculum provided by the USN. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills either one of the two physical education credits or one of the elective credits required for high school graduation. Fee: NONE Prerequisites: Must have successfully completed NJROTC III with a “C” or better and have instructor approval. Must agree to abide by U.S. Navy Standards, rules and regulations. Must be physically capable of performing drill and physical fitness training.

Navy Junior ROTC IV Honors – 52904

Course Scope:

This one-year course is designed for fourth-year students in the Navy Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps (JROTC) who serve as members of the JROTC cadet senior staff. Students are assigned specific functional areas of responsibility and are expected to perform their duties/responsibilities in addition to mentoring and leading other members of the organization. The JROTC curriculum emphasizes citizenship, character development, leadership development, and community service. This program is conducted at accredited secondary schools throughout the nation, by instructors who are retired United States Navy (USN) officers and enlisted personnel utilizing curriculum provided by the USN. This course is designated as honors level in that students are expected to apply higher-level leadership, organizational, communication, and interpersonal skills in the performance of their duties. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills either one of the two physical education credits or one of the elective credits required for high school graduation. Fee: NONE Prerequisites: Must have successfully completed NJROTC III with a “C” or better and have instructor approval. Must agree to abide by U.S. Navy Standards, rules and regulations. Must be physically capable of performing drill and physical fitness training.

ROTC Drill and Leadership – 5480

Course Scope:
This one-year course is designed to provide the ROTC student with a specialized area of military precision drill involving above- normal physical activity that will have carry-over value into future military careers. This course is not a substitute for the basic ROTC courses. Students will expend additional time and energy on military drill in preparation for participation on a performing team, i.e., Marching Drill Team, Rifle Drill Team, or Color Guard. Performances may be in competitive contests. This course

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may be repeated. This course will fulfill one of the elective credits required for graduation. Prerequisites: Must be currently enrolled in either NJROTC I, II, III, or IV and have instruction approval. Must be physically capable of performing drill and physical fitness training.

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Performing Arts Department

Eldorado High School prides itself in offering students a wide variety of performing arts courses. Creativity, originality, and skill development are all featured in a positive learning environment.

Band

This one-year course is designed for students with no previous band experience. The course involves applying basic fundamentals of music reading and the specific performance techniques of the instrument being studied. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills either one elective credit or one Arts/Humanities credit required for high school graduation and may be repeated.

Band High School Intermediate – 7225 Course Scope: Fees: $25

This one-year course is designed for students who have successfully completed the skills required in beginning band. The course involves applying both basic and intermediate fundamentals of music reading and the specific performance techniques of the instrument being studied. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills either one elective credit or one Arts/Humanities credit required for high school graduation and may be repeated.

Band High School Advanced – 7230 Course Scope: Fees: $25

This one-year course is designed for students who have successfully mastered intermediate band skills. The course involves applying both intermediate and advanced fundamentals of music reading and the specific performance techniques of the instrument being studied. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills either one elective credit or one Arts/Humanities credit required for high school graduation and may be repeated.

Band Marching High School – 7245 Course Scope: Fees: $25

This one semester course is designed for students already participating in the concert band program. Marching band emphasizes both musical skills and the awareness of movement within time and space. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills either one half of one elective credit or one half of one Arts/Humanities credit required for high school graduation and may be repeated.

JAZZ BAND – 5550
Course Scope: Fees: $25

This one-year course is designed to introduce the instrumental music student to contemporary stage band literature and techniques. A student will receive direction in solving interpretation problems and will be given an opportunity to experiment in the area of improvisation. The importance of sustained effort and practice is stressed for technical proficiency. A variety of performing experiences will be provided. This course may be repeated. If this course is taken in grades nine to twelve, the student will fulfill either the one arts or humanities credit or one of the elective credits required for graduation.

Band High School Beginning – 7220 Course Scope: Fees: $25

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Dance

Dance I – 5050
Course Scope: Fees: $20 for uniform and locker.

This one-year course is designed to develop an appreciation of dance as an art form. Through movement experiences, students communicate in a way that is different from the written or spoken word, or even from other visual or auditory symbol systems. Students develop higher order thinking skills through perceiving, analyzing, and making discriminating judgments about dance. The student examines the role and meaning of dance in diverse social, cultural, and historical contexts through a variety of dance forms. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills either the one Arts/Humanities credit or one of the elective credits required for graduation.

Dance II – 5060
Course Scope: Fees: $20 for uniform and locker.

This one-year course is designed to promote dance training for a higher level of achievement. This course will develop and extend the artistic, affective, cognitive, and psychomotor potentials of the advanced student. The student will be provided with opportunities to explore, create, organize, evaluate, and perform a variety of dance forms. This course may be repeated for elective credit and will fulfill the Physical Education II credit required for graduation.

Instrumental Music Studies

.Mariachi Harmony High School Beginning – 7295 Course Scope:

This one-year course is designed for students with no previous Mariachi guitar/vihuela/guittarron experience. Areas of concentration include correct posture, note reading, aural skills, flat picking, singing, rhythmic patterns, chord study, finger melody construction, musical forms, tablature notation, improvisation, and performing experiences. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills either one elective credit or one Arts/Humanities credit required for high school graduation and may be repeated

Mariachi Melody High School Beginning – 7300

Course Scope:

This one-year course is designed for students with no previous Mariachi violin, trumpet, or vocal experience. Areas of concentration include correct posture, note reading, aural skills, singing, instrumental technique songs, rhythmic patterns, construction, musical forms, improvisation, and performing experiences. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills either one elective credit or one Arts/Humanities credit required for high school graduation and may be repeated

Mariachi High School Intermediate – 7310

Course Scope:

This one-year course is designed to allow students to perform in an ensemble which has a selected membership and specializes in performing intermediate-level Mariachi ensemble literature. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills either one elective credit or one Arts/Humanities credit required for high school

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graduation and may be repeated.

Mariachi High School Advanced – 7315

Course Scope:

This one-year course is designed for students who have successfully completed the intermediate-level Mariachi performance course and are interested in performing in an ensemble which has a selected membership and which specializes in advanced- level Mariachi ensemble literature. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills either one elective credit or one Arts/Humanities credit required for high school graduation and may be repeated.

Theatrical Studies

Technical Theater I – 6827 Course Scope: Fees: $15

This one-year course will acquaint the student with the craft skills of theatrical production. Students will be instructed in stage lighting, sound, scenery construction, costumes, properties, and backstage responsibilities. Students will assume technical responsibilities for school plays, musicals, and other theatre-related performances. This course will fulfill either the one arts/humanities credit or one of the elective credits required for graduation.

Technical Theater II – 6830 Prerequisites: Successful completion of Technical Theater I. Course Scope: Fees: $15

This one-year course will acquaint the student with the craft skills of theatrical production. Students will be instructed in stage lighting, sound, scenery construction, costumes, properties, and backstage responsibilities. Students will assume technical responsibilities for school plays, musicals, and other theatre-related performances. This course will fulfill either the one arts/humanities credit or one of the elective credits required for graduation. Prerequisites: Successful completion of Technical Theater I.

Technical Theater III – 6833 Prerequisites: Successful completion of Technical Theater II. Course Scope: Fees: $15

This one-year course is designed for students who have successfully completed Technical Theatre II. This is a course designed to further stagecraft skills in several areas, including scenic design, theatrical business, and construction techniques in a laboratory setting. Scenery, lighting, costumes, props, stage management, publicity, theatre business and sound will be explored. Students will be expected to work independently on advanced technical theatre projects and consult with their supervising teacher for guidance. Students will assume leadership and management responsibilities in preparation for post- secondary education and use in the work force. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills one of the arts and humanities requirements for graduation.

Theater Design Technology Advanced Studies (Technical Theater IV) – 6824 Prerequisites: Successful

Course Scope: Fees: $15

completion of Technical Theater III.

This one-year course is designed for students who have successfully completed Technical Theatre III. This is a course designed to further stagecraft skills in several areas, including scenic design, theatrical business, and construction techniques in a laboratory setting. Scenery, lighting, costumes, props, stage management, publicity, theatre business and sound will be explored. Students will be expected to work independently on advanced technical theatre projects and consult with their supervising teacher for guidance. Students will assume leadership and management responsibilities in preparation for post- secondary education and use in the work force. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills one of the arts and humanities requirements for graduation.

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Theater I – 7615
Course Scope: Fees: $15

This first-year course is designed to familiarize students with the theatre: its intent, structure, effectiveness, and value. Class work focuses on student performance through demonstration of various acting skills. Continuous emphasis will be made to develop awareness and self-expression, to increase general knowledge of the theatre, and to encourage social adjustment. This course will fulfill one of the elective credits required for graduation.

Theater II – 7620 Prerequisites: Successful completion of Theater I. Must participate in school productions. Course Scope: Fees: $15

This one-year course is designed for students who have successfully completed the appropriate Theatre I course or who have participated in an approved equivalent school or community theatre oriented experience. Students will demonstrate advanced acting skills through reading, rehearsing, and acting theatre literature. Group interaction and ensemble work will be emphasized. Students are expected to be involved in theatre festivals and workshops. This course will fulfill either the one arts/humanities credit or one of the elective credits required for graduation.

Theater III – 7625 Prerequisites: Successful completion of Theater II. Must participate in school productions. Course Scope: Fees: $15

This one-year course is designed for students who have successfully completed the appropriate Theatre II course or who have participated in an approved equivalent school or community theatre oriented experience. Students will demonstrate advanced acting skills through reading, rehearsing, and performing theatre literature. Group interaction and ensemble work will be emphasized. Students are expected to be involved in theatre festivals and workshops. This course will fulfill an art/humanities elective credit toward high school graduation.

Theater IV – 7630 Prerequisites: Successful completion of Theater III. Must participate in school productions. Course Scope: Fees: $15

This one-year course is designed for students who have successfully completed the appropriate Theatre III course or who have participated in an approved equivalent school or community theatre oriented experience. Students will demonstrate advanced acting skills through reading, rehearsing, and performing theatre literature. Group interaction and ensemble work will be emphasized. Students are expected to be involved in theatre festivals and workshops. This course will fulfill an art/humanities elective credit toward high school graduation.

Vocal Music

This one-year course is designed to familiarize advanced vocal music students with a variety of music literature and the many

techniques of vocal production. This course will fulfill either the one arts/humanities credit or one of the elective credits required for graduation. *Performances in concerts and festivals outside school hours will be required. Students must rent their uniforms from the choir department.

Glee Club – 7670
(Women’s Glee) Prerequisite: Students must try-out and be accepted for this class. Course Scope: Fees: $15

This one-year course is designed as an introductory study in vocal production and music fundamentals with opportunities to perform a variety of ensemble literature from historical periods. Career and vocational possibilities will also be explored. This course may be repeated for credit. This course will fulfill either the one arts/humanities credit or one of the elective credits required for graduation. *Performances in concerts and festivals outside school hours will be required. Students must rent their uniforms from the choir department.

Chorus – 7660

Prerequisite: NONE

Course Scope: Fees: $15

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Glee Club – 7670
(Men’s Glee) Prerequisite: NONE Course Scope: Fees: $15

This one-year course is designed as an introductory study in vocal production and music fundamentals with opportunities to perform a variety of ensemble literature from historical periods. Career and vocational possibilities will also be explored. This course may be repeated for credit. This course will fulfill either the one arts/humanities credit or one of the elective credits required for graduation. *Performances in concerts and festivals outside school hours will be required. Students must rent their uniforms from the choir department.

Madrigals – 7680 Prerequisite: Students must try-out and be accepted for this class. Course Scope: Fees: $15

This one-year course is offered for the purpose of allowing students to perform in an ensemble which has a selected membership and which specializes in performing a particular type of literature. Madrigal Ensemble specializes in contrapuntal music of the 16th, 17th, and 18th Century. This course may be repeated for credit. This course will fulfill the one arts/humanities credit required for graduation. *Students must purchase their own uniforms. Performances in several festivals, concerts, and rehearsals outside of school hours will be required. There will be at least one required out-of-town festival during the school year.

Vocal Ensemble – 7690
(Jazz/Show Choir) Prerequisite: Students must try-out and be accepted for this class. Course Scope: Fees: $15

This one-year course is designed to offer advanced music students in-depth opportunities with rehearsal and performance practices stylistic of the particular ensemble literature. This course may be repeated for credit. This course will fulfill either the one arts/humanities credit or one of the elective credits required for graduation. *Students must purchase their uniforms. Performances in several festivals, concerts, and rehearsals outside of school hours will be required. There will be at least one required out-of-town festival during the school year.

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Health Education – 5100 Grade 9
Course Scope:

Physical Education Department

This one-semester course examines the intricate relationships between the structural and physiological functions required for the mental, physical, social, and emotional wellness. Topics include decision making, wellness, nutrition and physical activity, body systems, substance use and abuse, communicable and non-communicable diseases, violence prevention, safety, and consumer health. Sex education and sexually transmitted infectious disease education, within established guidelines, is an integral part of this course. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to our society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. The course fulfills the one-half credit of health required for high school graduation.

Lifetime Sports and Recreations – 5440 Prerequisite: teacher approval required. Grades 11 – 12 (Girls and Boys)
Course Scope: Fees: $20 for uniform and locker.

This one-year course is designed for students who have successfully completed two years of physical education. This course provides students with a comprehensive understanding of lifetime sports and recreational activities. Students focus on improving sports skills, participating in lifelong sport and recreational activities, and improving fitness levels while working at moderate to vigorous levels for a minimum of 50% of the instructional time. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills one of the elective credits required for high school graduation.

Physical Conditioning with Weights – 5460 Prerequisite: teacher approval required. Grades 11 – 12 (Girls and Boys)
Course Scope: Fees: $20 for uniform and locker.

This one-year course is an activity-oriented course designed to provide students with a comprehensive view of physical conditioning through different styles of weight training and builds upon the knowledge gained in Physical Education I and II. Students develop psychomotor skills and engage in movement and lifetime fitness activities at moderate to vigorous levels for a minimum of 50% of the instructional time. Fitness-related vocabulary, desirable health habits, physical conditioning, skill development and safety are emphasized. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to our society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills one of the elective credits required for high school graduation.

Physical Education I – 5010
Course Scope: Fees: $20 for uniform and locker.

This one-year course focuses on students becoming independent decision makers capable of planning for lifetime fitness and physical activity, while achieving current personal fitness and activity goals. Students are provided with experiences in psychomotor skills, movement, goal-setting, and health-related fitness knowledge. Students develop psychomotor skills and engage in movement and lifetime fitness activities at moderate to vigorous levels for a minimum of 50% of the instructional time. Students participate in movement experiences, team sports, individual and dual sports, dance/rhythms, and lifetime recreational activities. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills one of the two physical education credits required for high school graduation.

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Physical Education II – 5020
Course Scope: Fees: $20 for uniform and locker.

This one-year course focuses on the physical, mental, social, and emotional development of the individual in cooperative and competitive settings. The student is provided with experiences in psychomotor skills, movement, and lifetime health-related fitness knowledge, skills, and values. Students develop psychomotor skills and engage in movement and lifetime fitness activities at moderate to vigorous levels for a minimum of 50% of the instructional time. Students participate in activities that apply movement principles found in team sports, individual/dual sports, fitness and wellness activities, dance/rhythms, and lifetime recreational activities. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to our society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills one of the two physical education credits required for high school graduation. Fees: $20 for uniform and locker.

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Secondary Science Course Sequence 2015 – 2016

Grade 9

Biology
or Biology Honors

Grade 10

Geoscience
or Geoscience Honors

or

Chemistry
or Chemistry Honors

Grade 11

Chemistry Chemistry Honors

Geoscience Geoscience Honors

Physics Physics Honors

Grade 12

AP Chemistry

Chemistry Chemistry Honors

Geoscience Geoscience Honors

Physics Physics Honors

Grade 9-12 Elective Credit Only

Principles of Anatomy/Physiology Honors Forensic Science I
Forensic Science II

Principles of Marine Science

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Biology – 3010 Grade 9

Course Scope:

Science Department Core Classes

This one-year course is designed as a survey of the biological sciences. The emphasis is on developing inquiry skills and problem- solving techniques while developing an understanding of major biological concepts. The course also familiarizes students with the nature of science and technology. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to our society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills one credit of the Nevada high school graduation requirement for science and qualifies as a laboratory science for college entrance.

Biology Honors – 30104 Grade 9
Course Scope:

This one-year course is designed around introductory biological concepts designed for the academically-oriented student. Emphasis is placed on developing critical-thinking skills, research skills, and laboratory techniques. Independent study projects and inquiry- based learning experiences are integral parts of the course requirements. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to our society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills one credit of the Nevada high school graduation requirement for science and qualifies as a laboratory science for college entrance.

Chemistry – 3100 Grade 10 – 11 Course Scope:

This course is designed for those students who have successfully completed Algebra I and exhibit an interest in science, especially chemistry. Topics included are mathematics of chemistry, safety, laboratory procedures, properties of matter, atomic theory and structure, mole concept, chemical bonding, nomenclature, chemical equations, stoichiometry, kinetic molecular theory, states of matter, acids-bases-salts, equilibrium, thermochemistry, polymer chemistry, nuclear chemistry, chemistry of the environment, and career opportunities. Science, Technology and Society (STS) issues will be an integral part of this course. Additional topics may include history of chemistry, biochemistry, qualitative chemistry, and research projects. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to our society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills one science credit toward high school graduation and qualifies as a laboratory science for college entrance.

Chemistry Honors – 31004 Grade 10 – 11
Course Scope:

This course is designed for those students who have successfully completed Algebra I and exhibit an interest in science, especially chemistry. Topics include: mathematics of chemistry, safety, laboratory procedures, elements-compounds-mixtures, atomic theory and structure, structure and organization of the periodic table, mole concept, chemical bonding, nomenclature, chemical equations, stoichiometry, kinetic molecular theory, phases of matter, solutions, acids-bases theory, equilibrium, thermochemistry, organic chemistry, nuclear chemistry, chemistry of the environment, and career opportunities. Science, Technology, and Society (STS) issues will be an integral on-going part of this course. Additional topics may include history of chemistry, biochemistry, qualitative chemistry, and research projects. This course is distinguished from Chemistry I by the instructional pacing and the delivery of advanced content. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness

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including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to our society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills one science credit towards high school graduation and qualifies as a laboratory science for college entrance.

AP Chemistry – 317020 Grade 11 – 12
Course Scope:

This one-year course is designed with an emphasis on meeting the requirements of the College Board Advanced Placement AP Chemistry examination. This college-level curriculum provides students with the conceptual framework, factual knowledge, and analytical skills necessary to deal critically with the rapidly changing science of chemistry. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to our society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills one credit of the Nevada high school graduation requirement for science and qualifies as a laboratory science for college entrance. It is expected students will take the AP exam in May. See your counselor if you have a financial hardship.

Geoscience – 3080 Grade 10 – 11 Course Scope:

This one-year course is designed to integrate scientific principles related to the Earth and its environment. Topics of this course include relationships between atmospheric processes and the water cycle, solar systems and the universe, and Earth’s composition and structure. The connections between Earth’s systems and everyday life are evaluated throughout this course. Demonstrations and lab experiences are an integral part of instruction. Scientific methodology and the metric system are integrated and modeled. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to our society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills one of the science credits required for high school graduation and qualifies as a laboratory science for college admission.

Geoscience Honors – 30804 Grade 10 – 11
Course Scope:

This one-year course is designed to integrate scientific principles related to the Earth and its environment. Topics of this course include relationships between atmospheric processes and the water cycle, solar systems and the universe, and Earth’s composition and structure. The connections between Earth’s systems and everyday life are evaluated throughout this course. Demonstrations and lab experiences are an integral part of instruction. Scientific methodology and the metric system are integrated and modeled. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to our society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills one of the science credits required for high school graduation and qualifies as a laboratory science for college admission.

Physics – 3200 Grade 11 – 12 Course Scope:

This one-year course is designed for those students who have successfully completed Algebra I and who exhibit an interest in science. Topics included are the following: laboratory procedures, mathematics applications, laboratory safety, waves, optics, relativity, kinematics, dynamics, energy, heat, electricity and magnetism, and atomic structure. Physics is a course that informs students about the interconnectedness among different types of forces and energy transformations. Demonstrations and/or lab experiences are an integral part of this course. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to our society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills one of the science credits toward high school graduation and qualifies as a laboratory science for college entrance.

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Physics Honors – 32004 Grade 11 – 12
Course Scope:

This one-year course is designed for those students who are concurrently enrolled in or have completed Algebra II/Trigonometry and who exhibit an interest in science. Topics included are the following: laboratory procedures, mathematics applications, safety, waves, optics, relativity, kinematics, dynamics, energy, heat, electricity and magnetism, and atomic structure. Physics is a course that uses mathematical relationships to guide students toward a greater conceptual understanding of physical concepts and processes. Demonstrations and/or lab experiences are an integral part of this course. This course is distinguished as honors level by the instructional pacing and the delivery of advanced content. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to our society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills one science credit toward high school graduation and qualifies as a laboratory science for college entrance.

Science Department Elective Classes

Principles Anatomy & Physiology Honors – 34504 Grade 11 – 12

Course Scope:

This one-year course is a survey of the fundamentals of anatomy and physiology. This course is designated as honors level by the accelerated pacing and depth of content. Topics focus on the interrelationships of human body systems. Demonstrations and lab experiences that employ proper safety techniques are essential to this course. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills one of the elective credits required for high school graduation. This course may allow students to earn college credit from CSN.

Forensic Science I – 6261 Grade 10 – 12
Course Scope:

This one-year course is based on principles and procedures employed in criminal and civil investigations and introductory analyses performed by forensic scientists. This course focuses on applying scientific procedures to the collection, documentation, preservation, examination, and interpretation of physical evidence. Demonstrations and lab experiences that employ proper safety techniques are essential to this course. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills one of the elective credits required for high school graduation.

Forensic Science II H – 6262 Grade 10 – 12

Course Scope:

This one-year course is designed for students who have successfully completed Forensic Science I. Areas of emphasis include lab procedures, processing and examination of biological and chemical evidence. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of the course. This course fulfills one of the elective credits required for high school graduation.

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Principles of Marine Science – 3515 Grade 11 – 12

Course Scope:

This one-year course is a survey of the physical and biological marine environment. Topics covered include the history of ocean exploration, properties of seawater, interactions between atmospheric and oceanic systems, a survey of oceanic life forms, and human interactions with the marine environment. Demonstrations and lab experiences that employ proper safety techniques are essential to this course. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills one of the elective credits required for high school graduation.

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World History – 4080

Course Scope:

Social Studies Department Core Classes

This one-year course examines societal development from the Renaissance to the present with an emphasis on emerging ideologies, expansion of empires, growth of nations, and an increase of global interdependence. Students develop an understanding of current world issues and relate them to their historical, geographical, political, economic, and cultural contexts. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills the World History/Geography and the Arts/Humanities credits required for high school graduation.

World History Honors – 40804

Course Scope:

This one-year course examines societal development from the Renaissance to the present with an emphasis on emerging ideologies, expansion of empires, growth of nations, and an increase of global interdependence. Students develop an understanding of current world issues and relate them to their historical, geographical, political, economic, and cultural contexts. This course is designated as honors level by the accelerated instructional pacing and depth of content. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills the World History/Geography and the Arts/Humanities credits required for high school graduation.

U.S. History – 4160

Course Scope:

This one-year course is a study of American history with an emphasis on the Modern World from 1900 to the present day. Students explore and evaluate the significant historical events and the consequences. This course provides an examination of historical themes to analyze how new events continue to shape our nation and society today. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills the U.S. History credit required for high school graduation.

U.S. History Honors – 41604

Course Scope:

This one-year course is a study of American history with an emphasis on the Modern World from 1900 to the present day. Students explore and evaluate the significant historical events and the consequences. This course provides an examination of historical themes to analyze how new events continue to shape our nation and society today. This course is designated as honors level by the accelerated instructional pacing and depth of content. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills the U.S. History credit required for high school graduation.

AP U.S. History – 42202

Course Scope:

This one-year course is designed for the college-bound student, with an emphasis on meeting the requirements of the College Board Advanced Placement United States History examination. This course provides an in-depth examination, synthesis and evaluation of the historical themes from 1492 to present day. A careful balance of historiography, analytical skills, and factual knowledge will be used throughout the course. Instructors should refer to the current Advanced Placement course description for examination specifics. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures

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and their important contributions to society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills one U.S. History credit required for high school graduation. It is expected students will take the AP exam in May. See your counselor if you have a financial hardship. Students will also be required to do work over summer break to prepare for the AP curriculum.

U.S. Government – 4240

Course Scope:

This one-year course is a study of United States federal, state, local, and tribal governments evaluating the impact of political foundations, structures, processes, and institutions. Students apply constitutional principles to assess the growth and development of the United States government and political system. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills the U.S. Government credit required for high school graduation.

U.S. Government Honors – 42404

Course Scope:

This one-year course is a study of United States federal, state, local, and tribal governments evaluating the impact of political foundations, structures, processes, and institutions. Students apply constitutional principles to assess the growth and development of the United States government and political system. This course is designated as honors level by the accelerated instructional pacing and depth of content. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills the U.S. Government credit required for high school graduation.

AP U.S. Government & Politics (We The People) – 43002
Course Scope:
This is a one-year course with an emphasis on meeting the requirements of the College Board Advanced Placement United States Government and Politics examination. This course gives students an analytical perspective of government and politics in the United States. It includes both the study of general concepts used to interpret United States politics and the analysis of specific examples. Students increase their knowledge of the various institutions, groups, beliefs, and ideas that constitute United States politics. Instructors should refer to the current Advanced Placement course description for examination specifics. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills one U.S. Government credit required for high school graduation. It is expected students will take the AP exam in May. See your counselor if you have a financial hardship. Students will also be required to do work over summer break to prepare for the AP curriculum. In addition to the requirements above, students will be expected to prepare for competitions against other CCSD, state and national We The People teams.

Personal Leadership – 4528

Course Scope:

Social Studies Department Elective Classes

This one-year course will give students the opportunity for self-improvement through leadership and character development. Students will begin to discover and develop self-discipline, teamwork, and cooperation. Students will be offered a variety of opportunities, in and out of class, to serve in a leadership position by participating in school service projects that will encourage confidence to lead and participate in small groups. Instructional practices will incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to our society. The use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course will fulfill one elective credit required for high school graduation.

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Magnet School
ACADEMY OF VIDEO GAME TECHNOLGY AND WEB DESIGN

The following standards have been developed by Eldorado High School to provide the best possible academic environment for student learning. These standards will be used as retention guidelines for all academy students. Failure to meet standards will result in probationary status for the second semester. If the deficiency persists after the second semester, the student will need to return to his/her zoned high school. Every effort will be made by the Eldorado staff to assist students in achieving and maintaining these standards.

Each semester students must:

  • Maintain a minimum 2.0 GPA.
  • Earn at least a “C” grade in their Academy class.
  • Pass ALL classes.
  • Have satisfactory discipline & attendance records.Magnet Graduation Certificate Requirements• To earn a Magnet Certificate, students must:
    • Meet all CCSD high school graduation requirements
    • Earn 24 high school credits
    • Earn four (4) credits in math
    • Earn four (4) credits in science
    • Successfully complete four‐year sequence of academy course work in their

    area of study.

    The Eldorado High School Academies further recommend students take Physical Education and Health classes during Summer School or online as doing so will open up more opportunities to take more Academy and other electives.

    Special education students participating in the magnet program will enroll in Eldorado courses in accordance with their Individual Education Plan and the approval of the Special Education Facilitator.

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Academy of Video Game Technology and Web Design

Freshmen

Sophomores

Juniors

Seniors

Digital Game Development I or Web Design I

Digital Game Development II and Lab or Web Design II (2 Classes) Lab

Digital Game Development III or Web Design III (2 Classes) Lab

Digital Game Development ADV or Web Design ADV

Algebra I, Geometry H

Geometry H or Algebra II H

Algebra II H or PreCalculus H

AP Calculus PreCalculus H

Biology H

Chemistry H

Physics H

AP Biology

English 9 H

English 10 H or Pre (AP) English 10 H

English 11 H

English 12 H

Physical Education, ROTC or Dance

Physical Education II ROTC II or Dance II

******Health – Take on line at home****

World History or World History H

AP U.S. History or U.S. History H

AP U.S. Government or U.S. Government Honors

Recommendation of Foreign Language:

a. Spanish b. German

Recommendation of Foreign Language:

a. Spanish II b. German II

Recommendation of Foreign Language: a. Spanish III b. German III

Recommendation of Foreign Language:

a. AP Spanish b. AP German

Elective Options:

Auto Tech I (CTE) Animation I (CTE) Computer Science I (CTE) Cyber Security

Graphic Design I (CTE) Robotics (CTE)
Theatre
Technical Theatre (CTE) Photography (CTE) Journalism

Publications Band Mariachi Choir

Elective Options:

Auto Tech II(CTE) Animation II (CTE) Computer Science II (CTE) Cyber Security

Forensic Science I H (CTE) Graphic Design II (CTE) Photography II (CTE) Robotics II (CTE) Technical Theatre II (CTE) Theatre II

Journalism II Publications II
Band Intermediate Mariachi Intermediate Choir Intermediate

Elective Options:

Auto Tech III(CTE) Animation III (CTE) Computer Science II (CTE) Design III (CTE)

Marketing II (CTE) Photography III (CTE) Robotics II (CTE) Technical Theatre III (CTE) Theatre III

Journalism III
Publications III
Anatomy and Physiology H Forensic Science I or II H Principles of Marine Biology

HBand ADV Mariachi ADV Choir ADV

Elective Options:

Auto Tech ADV
Theatre ADV
Anatomy and Physiology H Psychology
Forensic Science II H Principles of Marine Biology H
Technical Theatre ADV Photography ADV Journalism ADV Publications ADV
Band ADV
Mariachi ADV
Choir ADV

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Digital Game Development

Digital Game Development I – 6341

Course Scope:

This one-year course is designed to introduce students to the elements and structure of game design and development. The areas of major emphasis are game methodology, game genres, game theory, interactive experiences, and immersive environments. Project-based learning, collaboration, and portfolio development are essential elements of this class. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to our society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills one of the elective credits required for high school graduation.

Digital Game Development II – 6344

Course Scope:

This one-year course is designed for students who have completed Digital Game Development I. Areas of emphasis include skills in electronic game design and development, creation of assets, and game building. Instructional practices incorporate the integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills one of the elective credits required for high school graduation.

Web Design & Development

Web Design and Development I – 5388

Course Scope:

This one-year course is designed to provide students with the basic principles of web-page development using industry accepted applications and coding techniques. Students design, execute, update, and modify websites. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills either the one-half required computer credit and one-half elective credit or one of the elective credits required for high school graduation.

Web Design and Development II – 5392

Course Scope:

This one-year course is designed for students who have successfully completed Web Design and Development I. Students incorporate automation, animation, and interactivity in websites. Portfolio development is an essential element of this course. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills either the one-half required computer credit and one-half elective credit or one of the elective credits required for high school graduation.

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Student Services Department

Eldorado High School promotes the integration and placement of special education students in the least restrictive environment. An Individualized Educational Plan (IEP) committee, with parental involvement, work together to establish and maintain the most appropriate academic schedule for each special education student in accordance with goals and objectives identified in his or her IEP. Eldorado High School offers special programs in the following areas:

CONSULTATIVE PROGRAM: In accordance with state standards, the consultative model of instruction is designed to meet the needs of special programs students who are to receive an option one diploma, and who are mainstreamed into a general education class or classes. A special education teacher works indirectly with the regular education teacher to assist with techniques and adaptations necessary for student success in the regular education environment. A student’s placement in a consultative class is determined by the IEP team.

COOPERATIVE PROGRAM: In accordance with state standards, the cooperative model of instruction is designed to meet the needs of special programs’ students who are to receive an option one diploma, and who are mainstreamed into a general education class or classes. A special education teacher works cooperatively with the regular education teacher and provides direct assistance with techniques and adaptations necessary for student success in the regular education environment. A student’s placement in a cooperative class is determined by the IEP team. This model is offered in several areas.

RESOURCE ROOM: The resource model of instruction is designed to meet the needs of special programs’ students who need small-group instruction in a structured environment, and who need more intense instruction in the following academic areas. A student’s placement in a resource class is determined by the IEP team.

SPECIALIZED PROGRAMS: Specialized programs are more highly structured programs which provide the support necessary for students to achieve success on a comprehensive site. These students have access to all General and Resource core and elective curriculum in addition to their program’s specific elective offerings which focus on each student’s successful transition from school to the community.

Eldorado High school houses five programs that serve a variety of populations: 1 Autism

1 Mentally Challenged Specialized (MCS)
2 Specialized-Learning Disabled (SLD)
1 Specialized Emotionally Challenged (SEC)

STANDARD & ADJUSTED HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA:
• A student may earn a Standard High School Diploma:

o Upon completion of credit requirements in general and/or special education courses including the required areas of study.

o Upon successful completion of all Nevada High School Proficiency Exams. • A student may earn an Adjusted High School Diploma:

o Upon completion of credit requirements and/or general courses, or o Successful completion of IEP requirements.

Principles of Algebra – 2025

Course Scope:

This one-year course provides students with the necessary knowledge and skills for further studies in mathematics. It is intended to increase mathematical fluency in problem solving, reasoning, modeling, and effective communication in the study of number, algebra, functions, and statistics. Students with Individual Education Programs (IEPs) have diverse needs and course accommodations and/or modifications may be required based upon IEP identified need. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The use of

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mathematical tools and technology, including calculators and computer software, is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills the Algebra I requirement and one of the mathematics credits required for high school graduation.
Prerequisites: Placement based on IEP.

Principles of Geometry – 2065

Course Scope:

This one-year course provides students with the necessary knowledge and skills for further studies in mathematics. It is intended to increase mathematical fluency in problem solving, reasoning, modeling, and effective communication in the study of number, algebra, functions, and statistics. Students with Individual Education Programs (IEPs) have diverse needs and course accommodations and/or modifications may be required based upon IEP identified need. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The use of mathematical tools and technology, including calculators and computer software, is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills the Algebra I requirement and one of the mathematics credits required for high school graduation. Prerequisites: Placement based on IEP.

English I Applied – 1310

Course Scope:

English I, II, III & IV Applied

This one-year course provides instruction in the English Language Arts strands identified by the Nevada Academic Content Standards as reading, writing, speaking and listening, and language. This course is designed to build on knowledge and skills acquired in earlier grades but in more mature ways such as controlling the language and structure of text; completing more complex writing assignments; reading a range of literary and informational texts, both classic and contemporary; delivering more oral presentations; and participating in a variety of conversations and collaborations with peers and adults. Students with Individual Education Programs (IEPs) have diverse needs and course accommodations and/or modifications may be required based upon IEP identified need. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills one of the English credits required for high school graduation. Prerequisites: Placement based on IEP.

English 2 Applied – 1310

Course Scope:

This one-year course provides instruction in the English Language Arts strands identified by the Nevada Academic Content Standards as reading, writing, speaking and listening, and language. This course focuses on traditional (e.g., argument, persuasion, expository), technical, and creative modes of composition. Through the study of themes found universally in global text, both literary and informational, instruction emphasizes not only critical analysis of text, but also writers’ historical, philosophical, cultural, and ethical perspectives. Students with Individual Education Programs (IEPs) have diverse needs and course accommodations and/or modifications may be required based upon IEP identified need. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills one of the English credits required for high school graduation. Prerequisites: Placement based on IEP.

English 3 Applied – 1330

Course Scope:

This one-year course provides instruction in the English Language Arts strands identified by the Nevada Academic Content Standards as reading, writing, speaking and listening, and language. This course requires expository, analytical, and argumentative writing assignments that are based on readings representing a wide variety of prose styles and genres. The course is also structured around multicultural themes and perspectives found in literary, non-fiction, and expository texts by American

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authors to encourage students to think conceptually about the American past, present, and future as well as about the ethnic and cultural diversity of the American experience. Students with Individual Education Programs (IEPs) have diverse needs and course accommodations and/or modifications may be required based upon IEP identified need. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills one of the English credits required for high school graduation. Prerequisites: Placement based on IEP.

English 4 Applied – 1340

Course Scope:

This one-year course provides instruction in the English Language Arts strands identified by the Nevada Academic Content Standards as reading, writing, speaking and listening, and language. Instruction focuses on refining the skills required for post- secondary success. The writing focus in this course includes analysis, synthesis, and argumentation as they relate to workplace and real-world situations. A framework structured around universal themes that connect people across cultures and time anchors texts to real-life reading, writing, and speaking and listening opportunities likely to be experienced beyond high school. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. Students with Individual Education Programs (IEPs) have diverse needs and course accommodations and/or modifications may be required based upon IEP identified need. Instructional practices incorporate integration of diversity awareness including appreciation of all cultures and their important contributions to society. The appropriate use of technology is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills one of the English credits required for high school graduation. Prerequisites: Placement based on IEP.